5 Tips For Any Workshop – 212

5 Tips For Any Workshop – 212


Continuous improvement [is] better than delayed perfection “make the workshop your world like the world like see your workshop ” That’s a quote mark twain said several years ago, and I could not agree with this more. This is my third [shope] Third yes, my third shope and so far I’ve been in here a little more than [year] and have moved stuff around Several times you if you’ve watched me my videos previously you probably see that it looks a little bit different now than what it did in the last video but anyway the point for me to move a bunch of stuff or move the tool layout around is to gain a little bit of an edge [here] gained a little bit of efficiency here, and Because everything’s on wheels and on casters It’s really not much effort at all to move stuff around so it’s not like I’m making major major shop changes Just trying to continuously improve The efficiency and the workflow so today. I want to walk you [through] five things that I found to increase my shop Efficiency and productivity so the first one I’ve already mentioned just a second ago And it’s probably the most beneficial [for] anybody in a non-professional shop environment And that is to keep everything mobile keep everything on mobile basis or on casters and that’ll allow you to obviously change things as needed as your needs as your shop needs change and Also, if you don’t have a dedicated space to where you can leave your tools out at all times It’s obviously beneficial to be able to move all the tools away so you could use [that] shop space as It’s otherwise needed the second thing is to have all of your commonly used items open and visible and preferably within an arm’s reach of where they’re going to be used, so basically any working environment has multiple layers of storage and You utilize that in a way that it’s most convenient to how you work items that aren’t Used often it’s [ok] if they’re a little inconvenient to access so all of my lower drawer storage here on my miter saw station Isn’t incredibly convenient because you have to bend so far over so that is [long-term] storage? Advancing from that is my waist-High doors that are easily accessible and you can easily see down inside them and More convenient than that is all of my stuff that I use all the time that is Open and visit to use the miter saw as an example What are you most commonly going to be using at the miter saw odds are a tape measure of some kind a pencil? safety glasses hearing protection [maybe] you will use a square for your reference lines everything is right here within an arm’s reach of where you’re going to be working and something that I’ve Really found to be beneficial to have right next to my result is some type [of] setup to where you [can] Clip or hold your cut list as you’re working that way it’s all right here as you are working not to go hunt it down and you can just go through all of your cuts as Needed the vast majority of us use a drill and a driver in our workflow, so keeping them readily available is quite obvious But what do you use with the drill and driver most often and keep that? Right next to the actual drill and driver so as I grab [my] driver I’ve got access [to] one of the most commonly used bits that I use and as I grab one I can grab the other and go as needed and as I return them I can return them both to the Same spot this remains empty, and I can always grab the one that I need as I’m grabbing this now the drill [I] almost always use a countersink bit with my drill I barely ever use an actual drill bit so what I’ve got here is to again readily accessible to your drill to different countersink bits I always keep two because if you only have one then that one is going to break when you need it So it’s good to have a backup and at that point if you’re going to have [two] you might as well have them set to Two different depths so you never have to adjust these really finicky [allen] screws that are in these drill bits, so I pretty much always have one set to a Half inch or 3/4 inch material and then one for about one and a half inch material And I can always grab one as I’m grabbing the drill, and it’s just very convenient the third thing [is] something I just realized and seems to be working out really well and that is to group tools to Overlap the Dead space pretty much every single tool has some type of dead space on the side in which you are not Using that tool so the table saw you’re not using the right side of the table saw Far right because there’s always going to be the fence in the way, so you’re not really using space It’s kind of Dead space on the bandsaw You’re pretty much pushing stuff through the front side or pulling stuff through the back side Maybe standing off [to] the right side you’re never using this back left space same thing with a player I’m feeding stuff through on the infeed side pulling stuff out on the [outfeed] side and Standing to this side to access the height adjustment [I’m] never using this side of the player the area to the right of the table saw was never really assembly or Working space anyway, so overlapping this dead Tool space allows me to keep my planer out at all times which this is a 92 pound planer So I’ve realized that picking up every time I need to use it is really become a chore so having it out is very beneficial The Bandsaw is not interfering with the maximum capacity of the table saw because The bottom door is inset maybe a half inch or so from the maximum capacity of the table saw so there’s no interference with any one of these tools and This is also or moving the bandsaw over here is also cleared up an entire wall for me to add another tool to the shop Number four is to go vertical and stack your tools whenever possible this is a shot back and cyclone setup with all the hoses and attachments taking up just about as much space on the floor as the shot back itself just a little bit more than that and It doesn’t necessarily have to be [a] system like this you can have [a] flip-top system so I’ve seen a lot of [Flip-Top] Carts that had the have a miter saw mounted on top and then the top flips over and you have a bench top planer mounted On the other side so you have two tools one footprint taking up a lot less [space] so lastly Utilize high wall storage space for items that you can’t necessarily throw away, but don’t need to access anytime soon So this shop is actually a two-car garage attached to my house so what ends up [happening] is a lot of the stuff that we don’t need all the time like the Christmas tree or a cooler and Some lawn chairs [it] ends up getting in my shop, and I don’t want that to be taking up working space So having a spot to put this put the items up and out of the way is very beneficial [I’ve] got a full length shelf on my back wall, and I’ve actually made above my garage door Some similar Shelves as well, so utilizing wasted Space is Very beneficial especially when you go vertical with it [I] know there’s a lot of you out there that already have some workflow efficiency or storage solution tips and tricks that you like to share So please leave them in the [comment] section [below] so all of us can learn from that Hopefully, you’re able to get something out of this video, and I’m about to start in on the next dimensional lumber furniture project So I’ll talk to you later. [thanks] for watching


100 thoughts on “5 Tips For Any Workshop – 212

  1. Some great… AND practical tips. I definitely need to get organized. Just setting up my shop after years of dreaming… Thank you

  2. My tip. Long term items tend to automatically turn into hoarded items when they are out of sight too long. So sometimes we tend to keep them just visible to not forget we have them. Solution: Photograph, catalogue and keep it handy on your computer!

    Additional tip. Keeping stuff to get rid off in one spot is obvious. What I do to top that off is I keep notes of potential candidates to be auctioned or given away. It weirdly overlaps with my list of tools I keep juuuuust in case 😉

  3. New to wood working! Would like to get a good idea for the best height for benches tables etc. any suggestions? Thanks!

  4. Loved the video! Thanks. I will be applying your grouping of tools idea to my garage/shop. I also like your miter saw station. Did you spray paint your drill and driver?

  5. This guy may be or not be smart, he is however a genius at workshop organisation. I'd love for someone to provide a link to someone who has a better solution to shop organisation.

  6. I see your a Detroit sports fan. Check out my fb page. https://www.facebook.com/Wood-Works-Gerald-Fowler-284532698264808/?ref=bookmarks

  7. I have a tip for anyone that is going to build there own garage/ workshop , if you can build your walls taller then the standard 8 feet and pay a little more for vaulted trusses, it gives you enough space for a small mezzanine at around the 7 foot mark.

  8. Excellent video and very clearly explained. Dang. I wish I would have run across this video first. So much time that I wasted looking for videos on organizing tools just to find that most show you how to organize automotive tools like sockets and wrenches in a tool chest. That's good too, but what I needed were woodworking tool shop tips. Automotive is just a very very small part of my tool section.

  9. There were no surprises here for myself. But I sure did take a lot of years to come to the same conclusions! To those that are still forming their shops these 5 tricks are Solid Gold Value ! ! ! !

    In particular overlapping the dead spaces of the tools is not something that is obvious at first. But as you've shown it can reap major benefits. The trick is that at first glance it SEEMS like everything will be in the way. But as you've shown in this video what visually seems in the way really isn't. Something that you've done as well while not quite as obvious is you've overlapped your "working spaces" of these machines. The clear areas needed for the table and band saws are overlapping. As are the clear working spaces needed by the bandsaw and planer. So you've really got a double benefit from this arrangement.

    We can also stagger items vertically to avoid each other. In my own shop I shortened the height of my jointer stand so the jointer's fence sits just under the height of the run off table for the table saw. That way the jointer sits along one edge of the run off table where it uses the same clear working area already dedicated for the saw.

    One thing I would warn about. The shelving over the garage door should be limited to light bulky items in any parts of the country where the wet snow load can put a high seasonal load on this rather long supporting piece. Load that up with a lot of heavy items and it might see that add with the snow load to cause some short or long term issues.

    As always a great video. I love the pacing and clarity. Nothing that isn't needed but you still fit in all the details that are required.

  10. There were no surprises here for myself. But I sure did take a lot of years to come to the same conclusions! To those that are still forming their shops these 5 tricks are Solid Gold Value ! ! ! !

    In particular overlapping the dead spaces of the tools is not something that is obvious at first. But as you've shown it can reap major benefits. The trick is that at first glance it SEEMS like everything will be in the way. But as you've shown in this video what visually seems in the way really isn't. Something that you've done as well while not quite as obvious is you've overlapped your "working spaces" of these machines. The clear areas needed for the table and band saws are overlapping. As are the clear working spaces needed by the bandsaw and planer. So you've really got a double benefit from this arrangement.

    We can also stagger items vertically to avoid each other. In my own shop I shortened the height of my jointer stand so the jointer's fence sits just under the height of the run off table for the table saw. That way the jointer sits along one edge of the run off table where it uses the same clear working area already dedicated for the saw.

    One thing I would warn about. The shelving over the garage door should be limited to light bulky items in any parts of the country where the wet snow load can put a high seasonal load on this rather long supporting piece. Load that up with a lot of heavy items and it might see that add with the snow load to cause some short or long term issues.

    As always a great video. I love the pacing and clarity. Nothing that isn't needed but you still fit in all the details that are required.

  11. You guys are missing my point. I'm not arguing how much space a miter saw might or might not use, my question is how useful is a miter saw for the average hobbyist woodworker. But given that space is often precious there are other tools that would expand your options e.g. Lathe, jointer etc

  12. Jay, I'm wondering if you remember how many sheets of plywood it took to build your station. Do you recall?

  13. I love the idea with the dust collection. We work in a small basement and are always tripping over the vacuum, cyclone or hose so that will be a near future project

  14. Subscribed! Great tips — thanks for sharing. Do you have any plans you can share for your for your work table? Thanks again. Paul

  15. THANK YOU for this video! I hope I one day could build a garage so this is very helpful 😉

  16. A problem I run into is that I want to spend the small time that I have to woodwork woodworking, and not trying to organize my shop. But better organization would be SO much nicer. I made a shop cabinet with drawers recently so I have found a few projects to try to increase my organization, but when I'm building for my shop I find myself using cheap plywood and pine. But I love working with cherry, walnut, and maple. It's a trade off.

  17. Great ideas Jay. I'm in the process of organizing mine and I'm going to steal your storage idea above the door. Never would have thought of that

  18. Thanks Jay. Great ideas. I am beginning shop setup now. I'm running power in a week or so and then move in. This was very helpful for my work flow and organization planning

  19. This reminds me of 5s being implimented, productivity and organization created a well oiled machine. These are good strategies for keeping each work station highly productive.

  20. Well, thanks to you and your video, I've got to stop what I'm doing and start rearranging, and building carts with wheels, more shelving etc.Good job.

  21. Thanks…moving from my garage 12×22 to my converted overed bsmt deck 15×20. I will need all the help i can get…HEAT SOURCE?…have a gas line or 220v. Your suggestion

  22. Great informative video as always Jay. In your opinion, what would be the minimum size floor area to work in when setting up a new shop? I would be interested in your opinion. Thank you!

  23. A lot of shallow drawers. That way your stuff can be at the top of the drawer instead of a few deep drawers to dig through.

  24. Jay, What measures does your workshop have? I have an idea of ​​mine to design something similar to yours

  25. Great video… my one comment on your setup.. "Drawers are where tools go to die"
    I'm going to have as few drawers as possible in my setup. It's in progress now. You do have a really good shop though! I enjoy your videos!

  26. Thanks Jay. I like your ideas. My problem I'm having with setting up my 26×28 garage with only 8 foot ceiling. Is lighting? I am wondering if you have learned any does and don't on that situation. I'm currently in middle of insulating ceiling and have wired in 8 light sockets when first built it. I have found some LED 4' fixtures on sale so bought 6 ..do you find that having them hanging on chains better than flush mount to ceiling? And your opinion on wall lighting as well. I am thinkng of putting 4' fluorescent on wall with ADJUSTABLE angle brackets to get proper angle and lighting (WITHOUT SHADOWS) over the mitre saw and router table? Any suggestions would be appreciated by you or anyone willing to share some knowledge thanks.

  27. We used an old K-Mart display table on casters for a three tool set up. After making a rabbet but in the surface, we made three drop in inserts for a circular saw, router, and jigsaw all mounted upside down. It took a bit of work, but all three store underneath the work surface on the bottom, and there is a space just above for storage and tool accessories. Since it rolls it is easy to maneuver larger pieces of stock in a small shop to the best place for cutting and shaping. All in all, we are into the work table for less than $100 including the price of the table. I'm pretty happy with that as a project and it has already spawned several other projects. I like the way you approached the layout. Thinking about how the space would be used, and then planning where you don't stand while working helped you get a good layout.

  28. I like to work in my shop and use a simple principle. Wood storage in the rear and everything flows towards the door. Scrap, trash and finished products all go out the door, so why not have it end up there.

  29. Hi Jay, thanks for the quote and the pic. I copied it. Will frame it for my office and or the shop. Good techniques I like the redundancy tool. It is going to break. I have two table saws. I got one for $25 bucks with cast iron top. I ganged two together and one has a cut blade and the other has a dado fas and easy. The extra weight makes my saw heavier and less vibration.

    Very much enjoy your vids…

  30. Great tips Jay, it just would be nice to add the summary at the end of the video. But they are also on the link you put on the description, though. Thanks

  31. I just moved into a new house. I went from a 3 car garage with 10ft ceilings to a 2.5 car garage with 8ft ceilings. Man, I wish I had that vertical still. Ugh

  32. good info thanks for sharing, attaching, fastening, altering engineered roof trusses changes the engineering, just saying…

  33. Always great information on your videos. Love the organization of your shop. Great minds think alike. Keep up the great work

  34. Great tips, thanks. I appreciate that this is a functional shop and not some man have pad (nothing wrong with that, but the two are very different). I would recommend SafeRacks for overhead storage. And lots of LED lighting.

  35. Hi Jay, thank you very much for your video. Really appreciate the advice. I have a single car garage size workshop so space is much more limited. I dream of one day having a two car garage

  36. Jay that’s great organization. I’m good at organizing other people stuff but never take the time to organize my junk. I get frustrated with storing wood, scraps pieces that could be used in another project someday and someday never comes….I finally tossed all the scraps out into the backyard, piled up 6’ high like a haystack. Now Ive got to haul them off. I have a refrigerator, 6’ aquarium and a bicycle in my shop that I do t need…😖

  37. Thank you. Ive been watching "Woodworking garage layout" that I typed into search engine here on youtube and your ONE of the first that has actually given the damn advise Ive been looking for. 3 hours later!!! Spring is here and I am going to set up my garage to start making items and furniture flipping. I want to try my best to set it up the first time most efficiently. Im working with an almost 2 car garage, that is also used for storage.

  38. Dude, I had a shop as a custom cabinet maker for almost 10 years and incorporated the same technique with work space. My center was a big Unisaw, jointer and 36” drum sander with the dust collection in the middle. Managing dead space saves soooooo much room. Nice job!

  39. what a clever idea for your drawer handles! I Love it 🙂 Oh and thank you for sharing these tips…great stuff!

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