Campus Conversation at SDSU 2019

Campus Conversation at SDSU 2019


. . >>Well, good afternoon,
everybody. I was waiting for somebody to get things started then I realized
it was me to get things started. I appreciate you coming out this
afternoon and having a conversation about our campus, so we have our
leadership team and look forward to a good afternoon. Make sure I get this right.
So our agenda for the day, I’m going to take part of it and
we’re going to turn it over to some of the leadership teammates
to talk about other parts of it, but legislative update,
board of regents update, Vice President Kohrman is going to
talk about the budget. I’m going to talk about the efficiencies we have been
achieving. Michaela is going to talk about proactive enrollment
and marketing campaign, things you might not have seen, since you’re not 18-22. And then I we are going to tag
team summer construction and project discussion about what is
going on and we’ll open it up for questions. So on the legislative and board
of Regents updates, I don’t know
that I had much to do with this, but I work
hard at taking the number one priority, which is salary policy
every year to every meeting I go to with
policymakers and so we were successful and I think
fortunate that the governor gave us a 2.5% salary policy to work
with and the state of South Dakota picked up
an awful lot lot of health insurance cost
the system is going to face so there was good news from the
legislative that we had 2.5% salary policy. I wish it would
have been 4% but gave us something to work with to reward
you. Guns on campus bill, lots of
help from the student association, working
with a lot of us on that. I probably spent more time on that
issue than any other issue that I worked on during the session.
I identified 25 Senators that I interacted with on a very, very
regular basis that we had to get it
killed, so to speak, in the senate or it
had an awful good chance of passing. It was not — it didn’t make it
out of committee. They tried to resurrect it on
the floor, but we were successful, a lot of people were
successful in stopping that, that was a particular concern. There are ten states that allow
guns on campus and the tragedy yesterday at North Carolina state is just an
example of number one, why we don’t want
guns on campus, but active, proactive
response chief to that situation, which I’m sure we would have, too. The ten states 10 states that have it allow it
to name areas of exclusion but there are
large areas of the campus where guns are excluded and the bill
that was in front of South Dakota would allow for
no exclusions so you could have
taken an AR-15 into this room or to a
basketball game, so it was a troubling
piece of legislation that got a lot of attention. Also worked on Tracy green is a
super hero working with the board on the first amendment
situation. Very complicated, it took a lot
of time and the student association was
with us, with both of these issues so we did a lot of good
work together with the students. There was a bill passed and
we’re going to do a lot of training on first amendment and the irony of first
amendment rights have been restricted on protests on the pipeline doesn’t
escape me or anybody else. It is an interesting, challenging time for higher Ed and we’re working
— we’ve been notified that diversity is the next issue that
we have to work on for this next year, so we have to pay
attention and would appreciate help from the faculty senate,
which they were very helpful on the other two items
last year, too, that will take a real
campus effort to work on upcoming issues.
We did get permission over the next few years to tear down Scobey Hall
Hall. We God permission to do land transactions that will help us
out selling some properties, buying strategic properties. The
ones we’re selling, we are not using so it will be — those are
going to be very, very good for SDSU. The rural veterinarian medical
education program that we got permission from the legislature and the
governor and we’re excited about that to start a program with the
University of Minnesota. It is a real feather in our cap to have a veterinary program in concert
with one of the very best veterinarian programs in the
United States. It is a two-plus two principal. We’ll have
cohorts of 20. Provost Hedge is working with the provost of Minnesota to wrap
that up and that will start in 2021, so it
is right around the corner, actually. On the board of regents there
has been lots of changes in the board
itself there is new members. Last year there was a new
President and that is President Kevin sheafer
has been re-elected as President of the
board. Young certainly some good parts
of that but always with transition
and new members there is a loss of
institutional memory. Bob shutten was a Sutton was a tremendous leader
but he took on the director of the Presidents of the health
systems, which is good for us, too. We had adjustments in the
leadership transitions. You have seen the news about the
university center going to more of a community college model. I signed the MOU this week. It’s in the short run it is much
better for us. Provost Hedge and Vice President
Kohrman worked very hard on this, again, in the
short term this is really good for us, in the long term it
provides us the opportunity to offer associate degrees there
and it is up to us. If we perform up to our
potential and offer those degrees this will be a good
thing. We got a lowered tuition rate
out of the deal for our courses, which
we had been almost penalized with,
Dennis, before. We do not have the overhead of
the program and just lots of very positive things in the short term, but if
we aren’t aggressive moving into
the market with associate degrees and
stackable programs then we’ll — the cost
in terms of losing that Sioux City market could be very, very
serious to us. We have to look strong. We have to offer the great
programs that we have in a new way in Sioux City and we have to
help young people transition from Sioux City up to
campus. It is a lot of opportunities,
still a little bit unknown but that’s
what’s happening and it is all in play and should be approved
at the May board meeting. The marketing communications
team out of USD got way ahead of themselves. They were putting
out news releases with the wrong name of the program and didn’t
summarize the MOU so there has been a lot of confusion about
it, but I will leave it at that. The two really great things that happened at the last board of
Regents meeting was naming the Ness
School of economics. We will have an example of how powerful
that can be in recruiting. Very excited. I see Matt and I’m sure
many others from the econ department. This is a big, big step for us
and it follows on the heels of getting
a degree in business economics, which again is just a great step for us and we
want to thank Larry and Diane Ness for
providing the $5 million gift. It is just putting the resources
to work will be a great, great thing for all of us.
We also got permission to name the new performing arts center the Oscar
Larson performing arts center named
after Dale Larson’s father. I look forward to the day,
Matty, that we have a person win an Oscar who performed in our Oscar Larson —
right? So that is kind of silly, but it
is a beautiful facility and we hope you have had an opportunity
to go through it and visit it and it will be an
enormous improvement for us in recruiting and student life and
community life and your lives. It is a very very, very
wonderful addition to our campus.
So with that, I’m going to switch to the budget and turn it over to Rob
Kohrman. >>Robert Kohrman: So President
Dunn has given me the easy topic to talk about. Many of you heard
about where we are with the budget and we definitely have
some challenging opportunities. It is probably not — my first
year here is not what I wanted to walk into. Every time people get an e-mail from me or get a call from Rob
Kohrman they get a blank look. I think there is optimism going
forward. This will be a challenging year this being the development of the
FY20 budget. Before I get what the current budget situation
we’re in and how we’re going to work our way out of it, a couple
of principles and how we set the budget parameters around. Michaela is going to talk about
the enrollment plan and activities
so I will pass on that. One of the things we’re going to
strive for is for the first time in many year, we’re going to
have a balanced budget for the university when we enter in July
1 on fiscal year 20. We’re also going to make sure that our structural basis is sound so the
budget that is balanced will be sound
for many years going forward. We have challenges in front of us
in cleaning things up. We’re doing strategic
allocations as you heard, there has been budget adjustments
proposed around the university. We have not done an across the
board reduction and reallocation. Dennis has done a fantastic job
on the academic side. He met the thresholds and
proposed the reductions on the academic side and I have been
working with the other Vice Presidents to make sure we have
a sound proposal on the administrative side.
The two pieces we’re making sure the budge includes, we are
looking at all of the efficients on the academic and
administrative side, just a couple of examples I will point
out, one we called share services. Mike hole beck has led this on
the academic side that we believe we
have better bench strength to have fewer people manage the
finances on the administrative side and Mike had oversight and
can provide better guidance. We’re doing the same thing on
the administrative side. We’re creating an administrative team that allow to have better
insight and oversight of the administrative offices across
the university. In terms of enhancing generating
revenue, the big one is tuition coming from enrollment and
Michaela has done a fabulous job from different
financial aid strategies and recruiting strategies that will
help us get out of the financial challenges and then
also the partnership we have with the foundation. This
wonderful building we’re in, they have been wonderful partners in
looking for other opportunities as far
as fundraising and build buildings across the university. So the challenge we’re facing,
we have about a $7.7 million budget
shortfall walking into the year. Consists basically of three
areas, one is our budget was not balanced walking into this year, but $1.6
million, it was out of balance. Part of that was from an
enrollment shortfall that we did not recognize walking into
fiscal year 19. Part of it is from departments not having their own budgets
balanced, so that is part one. Part two is due to enrollment. Our enrollment, we had a loss of
over 400 students which translates to a loss of $4 million of tuition revenue
for this year and we’re making a different change in how we do
budgets. We’re also looking into the future to anticipate what enrollment drops
may loo into the following years and build that into the FY20
budget. Because of a small class this year, that small class will
have to go through the university as they become sophomores, juniors, seniors or
become master students year one or PH
students year two that will result into a
shortfall of $1.3 million as well. The enrollment problem is $5.3
million and we have other financial challenges that we
have to take care of where we made commitments to
various administrative areas around the university that we
have to solve their problems as well. So that is about another
$900,000, so those are the three components driving to the $ 7.7 million deficit.
Nothing has been finalled. The Deans have been working with
Dennis to provide solutions to come up
with academic reductions and President Dunn looking at
administrative reductions. Some of the proposed ideas right
now is 5. 4% reduction on the academic
side of the house that’s about $ $3.2 million reduction on their
side. It includes 18 faculty
positions, but those positions are vacant or upcoming
retirement so they are not eliminating filled faculty positions going
into FY20. On the administrative side,
we’re looking at about $3.5 million reductions about 7. 5% even though the numbers are
close, please note the administrative side is taking a
larger cut than the academic side. One of my core values being an
CFO to make sure the academic side of the house needs to be bolsters and take
fewer cuts than the administrative side of the
house. On the administrative side, 20 positions, the majority
of the positions are vacant positions or
positions that have been — people are retiring. The challenge though, because
we’re — the first and second bullet in
academic reductions are vacant positions
meaning the money has not been sitting there, the college has
been using those resources for other things so they have to
look carefully in how they spend their money in the future
because the dollars will not be there.
We’re going to look at the last piece is about $800,000 of other
reductions and the primary thing what we’re doing is we’re trying
to eliminate what I call paying off our credit cards. We have
debt sitting with the foundation for capital projects that we have to pay for, plus the
foundation on several projects are charging 5.
7% interest on those debts so my goal is to reallocate resources to buy
down the debts so the debts no longer exist on our books. Again, I just want to
re-emphasize the major thing I’m trying to push is making sure
the university is on sound financial footing. I have
optimism going forward, especially on the enrollment
side where we expect to see a decrease in enrollment because
of a small class next year. I believe by fiscal year 21, we
will see an uptick in enrollment
across the board but that is with
conservative enrollment. I will be happy to take
questions at the end or during the process. At the end, OK.>>Thanks, Rob. The board of
regents has made this is a priority of theirs and with the
utmost respect, I have been using this slide all over the
state in my presentations and I used it in my presentation
to the appropriations committee. I think this is a powerful slide
because I think we are very efficient. If you use the cost calculator
on our website and use the cost
calculator on the UML, Iowa state and North
Dakota state this comes up. We are very efficient at delivering accredited degrees in the
classical land grant fields of agriculture, engineering, pre-professional
programs, pharmacy, nursing, et cetera. We — you do a great job and I’m grateful for it, how well you’re
able to manage the programs and the academic quality. I was bragging about Andrea
Carlisle, I don’t know where Andrea is, Andrea Carlisle and
the engineering folks winning all of the competitions they go
in and that’s true in the economic side. It is true all across campus. Student performance at
professional meetings, whether it be a poster competition or the honors
college, Becky, super high levels of performance and we’re
doing it at a fraction of the cost of our major competitors.
I showed this yesterday at the council of President’s meeting
and I show it all of the time that we are very, very
efficient. So the cost cost of degree for
us is a fraction of the percent of an
in-state Minnesota or our neighbors to
the north and south. I do though — we have to be
cognizant of the measures of efficiency
that the board of Regents looks at and
those are spatialization, productivity, so
provost Hedge works hard with the Deans and the department heads to making sure
and Mary Kay does a lot of the heavy
lifting to make sure when we report out — I can tell you in almost report of
efficiency we are number one out of the six
so, so a lot to be proud of. How have
we achieved that or what we are doing to continue the effort on
efficiency? The college re-alignment was
designed to boost enrollment and set
ourselves apart, not only the arts but the sciences, the classical sciences
and I think we have done a good job at that and seeing a response. The work done in the college of
arts and social sciences to consolidate smaller departments
into larger schools. We eliminated department heads when they retired so it has been kind
of a soft move that is going to have a major impact. I think we’re going to highlight
the excellent work in the schools, I think a much higher degrees, so lots of
great work. Becky DEAGAN, works in the budget and
finance office has lead 19 lean
initiatives across campus from the one I
think about is on scholarships where she
worked with Steve’s team with the foundation and through that
process and Michaela will highlight some of the changes
that were made, really did streamline our scholarship process and made it
much more effective and we’re seeing a response to that. A lot to be proud of on the
efficiency side. When you can offer a degree in engineering, Bruce, for 60
something percent than the state of Minnesota, we’re doing good.
I politely push back but at the same time, we need to be leaders
in efficiency. We need to be the leaders in
spatialization whether that is on dorms, Doug, I think Doug is here
somewhere, in dorms, Doug. We need to make sure the numbers
are high. We need to do it on the academic
side, too that is why we are removing SCOBEY. We know a couple of
departments in the basement of Hanson hall have been there too
long and we have solutions coming for that. We have to look
at all types of efficiencies. I back up a couple of slides, I
think, I wanted to say before we move on,
that first bullet and why I had that
up there for this particular slide on the
budget is the work that you did, a lot of you did on strategic
enrollment management is the guiding principle underneath the
budget decisions we made. I want you — I will say it
again, the strategic management plan was developed a year ago
where we had opportunities because of growth and demand
that is the underlying, underpinning factor
in the decisions we made about the budget. Does that make
sense? It is a very strategic process. We might — we are going to
certainly use some of those open positions
or the retirements to get us through this year, but in the
long term we’re committed to that plan Greg, that I know you
and your team helped work on last year,
does that make sense, Matt? That is why that bullet is up
there and I wanted to reiterate that. I will catch us back up here. So now, I’m going to ask
Michaela Willis Vice President of student affairs to talk about
proactive recruitment and marketing. >>Michaela Willis: Thanks,
President Dunn. Before I go into the slides to talk about the new
and exciting things happening this year, I would like to do
two things. One, if you’re a member of the strategic management enrollment
council, if you would stand I would like to recognize you for the work you
have done to make the plan come together. I see many of you
here. Thank you. Second, while I have the
opportunity to really share some information on our proactive
recruitment and marketing initiatives, I think there are
key players in the room that really make all of the magic
happen and brought the ideas forward and have carried out
those ideas and made them happen. I would like to recognize Shawn
and the admissions team, Mike in the marketing and communications
team and Lindsey Hamlin in the continuing education team. They put a lot of work, energy,
and effort to making this happen, so thank you to all of
you for your work in that area. There is an enormous amount of
work that has gone into the initiatives that I’m going to
talk about. I’m going to highlight a few key things that
happened throughout the year that I think are really
important. We launched several initiatives
with EAB as our partner, one of them
is the sophomore and junior search campaign where we reached out to 75,000
students in their sophomore and junior
year to promote South Dakota university. We had a 9.6%
response rate on the campaigns up to this point, which is a
little bit higher than the average response
rates for most of the other campuses
across the country that use EAB so there has been a lat of work
in that area. We enhanced how we communicate
with students from the admissions always and text
messaging is one of the new avenues we are using in the
recruitment process to connect with students in new
and different ways and the ways that students are used to using
in regular ways, so there has been a lot of
changes in what we do and how we use our
CRM tools and things like that. I wanted to highlight a couple
of the things we’re doing different there are many, many
others happening behind the scene. The Orr day President — other
day President Dunn sent a note saying that we had an individual
reach out saying my granddaughter and my grandson
are both looking at SDSU and my
granddaughter is coming here in the fall. I have to tell you
from both of them the level of personalization and the level of
communication are that we have received from South Dakota
university through the admissions always, through the academic departments has
made the university stand out in some big ways. I think that is
just a testament to the level of work and the amount of
personalization and communication we are doing with
those students as we move forward.
In addition, President Dunn mentioned, we made quite a few changes
around scholarships and there that has been scholarship task
forces that their work has been implemented in different ways. The Jackrabbit guarantee was
updated for this fall class to really broaden and expand it and
change a little bit about how we award that
scholarship process and we received a lot of positive
feedback and some great acceptancess back in that area. We are rewarding scholarships on
new students and returning students and we had a student say I thought this
was spam because I’m getting it so much earlier so our returning
students are receiving their scholarship notices before they
leave for final weeks. It has been hard work across the
university to accomplish that, so I want to recognize that.
We have a new net price calculator that is more intuitive, provides more
resources as they are comparing the cost of South Dakota
university to other institutions so we have that implemented and implemented more flexible
scholarship requirements and a number of other things. All of
those things together have helped to enhance what we’re
going to help students be successful at South Dakota
university and really achieve our access mission and help them in
that way. From a marketing campaign
perspective, admissions and marketing have been working closely together to
implement a number of different things but there are things
we’re doing differently on the admitted enrolled side with
marketing channels, whether that is
letters in the mail or digital ads pushed through social media,
different things, billboards, all sorts of different things
that are happening in new and different ways. We launched the flag campaign
and it is fun to see from Shawn in our regular meetings all of
the postings on social media from our students with
their SDSU flag excited about being a
Jackrabbit in the fall semester so it is fun to see that
campaign take off. We have student videos that have gone
out to students and we have monitored the analytics to make
sure what we are doing is effective and is
working. Through university marketing and
communication cation and our partnership we have Rabbit Food
that talk about different topics about being a South Dakota State
University student and we highlighted a number of things
in that particular area for Rabbit Food.
We featured key programs that were identified in the strategic
enrollment plan for growth. We were able to really promote
the new Ness School of management and economics through
that Rabbit Food area and our engineering college, so there
has been a lot of different things happening in those
particular areas, but again, I want to thank those who have
been involved in enhancing and being
proactive in that marketing initiative to bring in a great class for
the fall semester. >>I just want to highlight
that, so if you think about that last targeted Rabbit Food, I think it was 3, 300 prospective engineering
student, 3,300 checked the box for
engineering so we have been interacting with them
differently. How many contests did mechanical engineering win, Bruce, every
time our students did well, we let the
3,300 students know what have been
achieved, same thing with the Ness School. As soon as we got that name, we
see mailed over 2,000 prospective
business students who checked the box that I’m interested in a
career in business and fed them information, get the Rabbit Food
thing, very tough, so we’re doing that on those two
examples but many others, so that is very, very
different and exciting. We’re doing it — we did it with
the announcement on the veterinarian
science program, so as I look across the
room, Jane, whatever it takes to reach out and interact with
those pharmacy kids that are interested, whatever that is. I
encourage you to own this and be part of it. Lots of stuff going on this
summer in construction as usual, so hold
on. Watch out for directions, things will change a little bit. I’m going to turn it over back
to Michaela to talk about the first of those, but north campus drive
didn’t quite get done before the weather set in, so there will be
changes on north campus drive and so there are
big projects that will impact us this summer and we wanted you to
know about them. I think Michaela is going to go over the first three and provost
Hedge, a group of them and Rob is going to finish up, so
Michaela?>>Michaela Willis: OK, so there
is a lot of exciting things happening around campus, one of those is the
American Indian student center. It is fun to see the steel
starting to go up on that particular site,
but the American Indian student center will provide physical
environment and amenities to support the expansion of the
programs here. The new facility will be a prominent addition to the main campus and
highlight the initiative. It will include a general
classroom, multipurpose room, a student suite and offices for
the staff in the American Indian student center so there will be
opportunities to use this, not just for things related to the American
Indian student center programming but across campus. We hope as that opens up next
spring, you will find some opportunities
to utilize that space. It will be 12,000 square feet. It will
have a main level and there will be a small upper level as well
with it. When we move on to the southeast
university neighborhood and the apartment project, we are
excited about how that project has come together for us. It has 156-bed apartment
complex, which I can say are full, all
beds are rented so that is exciting. It is a combination of
one, two, three, four-bedroom units in
those apartments and there is a total of 45 units. There are seven two bedroom,
three bedroom and 42 four bedroom
units. We have five townhouses that are
a part of that those are divided into three separate units with
four bedrooms in each of the units. We are starting to fill
those up and I think we are a third of the way
full in the townhouse units but 60 total
beds in that area and five of those are
ADA accessible as well. We saw the walls begin to be
erected for the Starbucks that will be on campus. It will be a full-service
Starbucks on South Dakota university and they have been
doing cool things with the artwork to make it SDSU so it will be a
great space for students to study and for you guys to hold
meetings and have a cup of coffee that will be complete and
ready to occupy in August. Students will be moveing in
August, not too far away from right now.
The last project I will talk about is renovations to the
student union. West a $1.2 million renovation
project that will start this summer and conclude maybe by the end of October to November,
we are still finalizing the details. That project is funded
through the maintenance and repair dollars for the student
union. This will be phase one of a three-face project with a
completion towards the end of October to maybe early November.
With the first phase of the renovation, we’re going to be
relocating the office of multicultural affairs up to
the second level at the top of the main staircase in that
particular area. It will provide increased prominence for the office of of
multicultural affairs. We will be relocating
temporarily the three conference rooms that space will overtake
to the lower level. When we get into phase two and phase three,
we will create the permanent conference rooms and conference
spaces in those areas and the cottonwood conference room will
be renovated as well and that particular conference room will set the design standards
for the rest of the conference room upgrades. Phase two will focus on student organization space and a
standalone center with the union specifically for career
development so that will be phase two and phase three will include
conference and VBR upgrades. If they stay in that order or if we
move them around a little bit but we’re excited to move that
project forward and we’re excited to see construction
start this spring or this summer. I will turn it over to
Dennis and he will talk about a few other
areas. >>Dennis Hedge: Thanks,
Michaela. Good afternoon, everyone. Before I go through
mine, very quickly, I wanted to say thanks. We’re here at the
end of an academic year and my remark to campus
through the newsletter, hopefully, you take great pride in our work, so again, I
hope over the course of the next three or four days as we watch
our graduates participate in the important ceremonies that, indeed, you take great
pride in that because that is what it is all about and that is
the product of your work. It is not lost on me, because
thank you for all you do to contribute to your success.
I’m going to go through the next projects, five projects that
have to some degree have an academic
link or academic component associated with them. These
projects, the first one I will walk through, animal research
and diagnostic laboratory so a
fantastic project. I think I saw maybe Jane come in
here. Standing back there. I didn’t get that far. A game changer for us so it is a
wonderful project. 8,000 square foot addition and it enables a
lot of things for us that we have not or would not be able to
do and I think more importantly than that, in addition to enabling, it enables
us to do it in a safe environment, which is very, very
important for us. We’re able to continue to serve
the region on broad scale and at the
same time that impactful work is able
to be done in a safe environment and that is fantastic for us. Work continues to be done, Dean
tells me in September we’ll have it
wrapped up, but again that is for phase one. There is a
secondary phase associated with the ADAL project and that
is the current or previous facility and that involves
mechanical work and exterior work and will be enabling for
us, too, as we look at the rural vet med
program and what we need to do there, again, that is important
to us as we look at our strategic priorities. The next project is The Barns so
the intermural building. To invite people, maybe you have
heard this, so hopefully this is a little bit familiar. The
overall strategy that we’re working with The Barn is to renovate and
create a home for the school of design, so that is the one thing
I want you to understand about The Barn and the moves being
made there. It is about creating, renovating
space and creating a space that becomes home of the school of
design so all of the associated programs, bringing them together whether that is
interior design, landscape, so on and so
forth to get them centrally located, including the freshman studio there has
been work ongoing there for sometime and this is a project
we divided up into two component phases. Phase one, going on through we
would anticipate through FY22. Primary emphasis has been on
maintenance and repair, but at the same time, doing other foundational
work that facilitates some moves and a
classroom modernization along the way here and there as we do
additional moves on our campus so we make sure we don’t leave
ourselves short, so that has been an important part of phase
one. Phase two is more dependent on
fundraising but that is where we get specifically into the program
elements. When I mentioned the
fundraising, I have great high hopes for the fundraising
potential here. For those of you who have been participants in the Jackrabbit philanthropy and talking about
the case statements, we have a category of restoring the glory and this is
one of the restoring the glory projects. Again, it has
resonated well. It resonated well when we did
our conversations that we had as we
did the build out of the case statement so we feel good about
where we’re positioned there. There will be fundraising work,
but if you envision what can be achieved with the beautiful
architecture and preserving its significance on the campus, it
becomes an important project. It is one that I get excited about. The third up there is Lincoln
Music Hall. Another wonderful historic
project, I think, and a very important building to us. It also is one of those items
when you will, you know, kind of take a look at the restoring the glory
component of the overarching case statement you will find it
there. Now that being said, we have
fund fundraising work to do. Over the course of the summer,
when these five projects are picked, you will see some work
being done. In fact, if you walk by the building you will see a
little bit of work being done there now. The work being done
there now would include things we really need to do to make the
facility useable over the short term, to be honest, so there are
some, as best abatement project and
masonry repairs that have to occur. On the inside, we’re
working on a few spaces. Dean and his team has been working on that, spaces that provide a
little bit of flexibility in regards to what we may
ultimately want to do with Lincoln, so provide
opportunities regards to classroom and other
opportunities to locate other important things on our campus,
whether that be for a short period of time or a longer
period of time. The work being done right now,
again, it is important work and helps in regard to the long term but also
provides added flexibility that will be important to us as we
navigate over the next couple of years. You will see work over
there and that is primarily that but the bigger piece will be an overall more grand
effort ultimately around Lincoln that will involve fundraising. Par pa Wagner Hall is up there. It is a unique project but there
is some connection with The Barn. Primarily because we have had
health and nutritional sciences in The
Barn and that is taking faculty
members in The Barn and locating them to Wagner Hall and we have
been doing that over the past couple of years and
making goo progress there. The vision with respect to Wagner
Hall is create a building that has a health sciences emphasis.
We know our college of nursing is there and also the health
sciences. We think, again, as we look longer term, the
President talked about efficiency efficiencies by
co-locating programs, obviously, that have that level of
connection, we may be able to identify operating efficiencies
and that is what we would hope to do.
A little bit of background in what is going on out there and
an important project I think you will see probably next summer is simulation
facility for college of nursing. I think Roberta is in Sioux City Sioux City today, we have an
important meeting tonight. We’re going to continue to work
on that. That will allows to move forward
next summer, not this summer, next
summer and that accommodates to play out.
The last building is a massive project and, again, a very exciting
project, the raven agriculture center. So for us, I think of it as a
game changer in many ways and there
has been excitement around the provision itself, but the
building will feature always spaces, classroom facilities, it
will feature collaborative environments in order to help
stimulate great ideas that will play out in the research
laboratories and other teaching and learning environments. We anticipate the construction
to begin this late summer or early fall and that project will
take the better part of two years with probably and an an anticipated opening of 2021. I will pass it over to Rob for
the next project.>>Robert Kohrman: So just wow,
when you think of the list and all that we have accomplished
and this doesn’t include things we have just completed
like PAC, the hearty renovation, the new wellness and if you added up all of
those projects and those here that is
over $25 billion in capital
infrastructure and we will be adding it shortly and it is an
amazing feat. I can’t imagine what the campus looked like five
or six years ago. This has a huge impact, maybe not the
construction part on the summer but when it is completeed on students and
when they want to come here. I want to give a shout out to
Dean. He is over there some place, hi,
Dean. All of the things he will be doing this summer, he bought
a bed in his office and he is not leaving
from May 1 until November so we appreciate your hard work on
that, Dean. One last project and I will turn
it over for questions, this might have a little bit of a
disruption for the center of campus and that is Campanile
Avenue that is phase one and the following summer and that will be from the
heating plant to Harding and that is phase two
and that is underground water,
sewer, campus lighting and it will have a little bit of
disruption for those who use that thoroughfare on a daily
basis. Again, all of the projects we’re doing is
transformational to this campus and will bolster us going forward,
the infrastructure and we can’t
thank Dean and his team for all of the work they have done and the shout out to
the students who developed a strategic plan and helping with
the infrastructure projects as well. I believe that is our last
slide. We will take questions for all of us, all of the hard
questions go to Dennis. [LAUGHTER]>>Can you give us more detail
about the — [inaudible]>>I will have Dennis help me. I told you he gets the hard
questions.>>Dennis Hedge: What we’ve been
asking for and working toward is to get
a tuition price point that does reflect the associates degree rate, I have
drawn a blank on what it is.>>The new number with the
increase of tuition is 275. It was 265 last year.
>>Dennis Hedge: So at that number, what we have been asking
for, what we believe would help us is for other
programs. If we have bachelor’s program or something like that,
if we were in a situation to where if we wanted,
100-200 level tuition rates we could offer them at the same
price point. What we believe and I think
there is evidence to support it and I will leave it at that is under the previous
where you have different levels of tuition that there would be an incentive
to declare as a general study
student and one institution, not naming one
South Dakota state was able to offer that and therefore, I believe it put us
at a competitive disadvantage and we
tried to level the playing field and allows to compete.
>>So under the agreement that is just running out, Don, we had to
offer courses at self support, which
is 355 or 360 and USD got to offer them at
265 so we’re all offering 10200 level
courses at the same price and online courses are at the same
price, too. It is a big, big difference for
us.>>To balance that versus — we
don’t want to compete with the on campus programs so there is some
balance of it.>>Dennis Hedge: You’re exactly
right, Don. We don’t want to create backend
pathways. We are confident with the market that is there that will not occur and
you are measuring upside. What is the potential win, what
is the potential high-end ceiling potential versus the
loss? I’m convinced we suffered losses
for students who migrated away from us and when that happens,
they become more familiar with a different institution, it is hard to win them back, so
that is why we believe this becomes a better strategy for
us. Great question, Don. We were very conscious of that as
well. You bring a good point.>>I think it is nearly 40% of
the graduates from all of the high schools in Sioux City don’t
go anywhere. They don’t go to the armedselveses. They don’t go to tech schools. If we can combine this with the
code of promise, which we have promise of getting, I think
we’re going to attract a group of young people that are
getting left behind in SIOUX falls. It is a fine balance not to rob
students from our campus, but to get students that we’re
absolutely not serving. While I wait uncomfortably here,
a big shout out to Andy, Kayla and the whole team from the alumni association
for hosting us. Help me thank the alumni
association. [APPLAUSE] The other one is to SDSU
foundation, I know Steve is here, I don’t know
if the others are here, Steve you brought in $58 million last year, over have a $70 million goal for this
year. The first quarter of this year
was the highest first quarter that we
ever had just an incredible difference
maker for us. Help me thank the SDSU foundation.
[APPLAUSE] Now you have to ask questions
here.>>I’m John Christensen human
resources for some of you I haven’t met. Have online
classes, has that drawn, you know, any students off campus
that typically we would see on campus
and in the residence halls, do we have
any idea on that or how that is trending?
>>Dennis Hedge: So I understand, is online going at the expense of
on campus type of things? That is a great question as well. So
I can always phone a friend here, too, I have other people. Lindsey, if you have additional
information. So the simple answer to that right out of the chute, John, there is no
evidence that would indicate that is the case. What the evidence that exists
out there, it indicates students
continue to evolve and change and they continue to evolve and
change and they are seeking access to education and
consuming courses, if you will in a
variety of modalities. The on campus students who is
delivering face-to-face class, but a high percentage are also
involved in online education — 44%? OK, so
anyway, I think that is more of the shifting and the migrating
we’re seeing in one where it is blended right now, John, and not
necessarily where there are offsets, if you will,
so we’re pulling people away. That being said, I think the
challenge is we have to recognize that and
I really do believe, again, I think it is something that we had SDSU have
prided ourselves on is access and access takes different
shapes and forms. One of the access issues is meeting
students where they are at and that does mean we need to continue to be
creative at doing things and bringing smart, you know
smartly thinking through programs and bringing those or
taking those offerings to students and if that means doing
so in an online environment because that is the way access
to education is best for them we need to embrace it. It is part
of my ongoing conversations with Lindsey and it has to be part of our future here at SDSU.>>My question on that, which I
get a lot as I go around the state, we’re not a small liberal arts college. The experimental learning and
courses that we offer in natural resource management or pharmacy or
engineering, especially the upper division courses, we want
their kids with their hands on a project and senior design
projects, so as pragmatic as our degrees are,
John, we can offer lots of degree programs and we want to
offer more online, but some of them, pharmacy nursing and all
of those I listed, there are an awful lot of courses that will
never be online because we want them in laboratories with hands
on and the speech courses. I’m not sure how you teach
speech online. I can’t figure it out but I will
go with it. [LAUGHTER] I think we will always be heavy
on experiencal type courses that are grounded in high level of
contact with faculty members. Yeah, Paul? Andrea beat you to the mic,
Paul.>>With recruitment and
retention a major source of our financial
woes, if that is OK to use the word, what
can we as individual faculty members do? What are your
marching orders to help us with recruitment or how do we be part
of that process?>>Michaela Willis: That is a
great question. I think there are a couple of things and some
are very simple. It is the small things we do each and every day
when we see a family walking across campus saying hello,
welcome to South Dakota State University. Hope you become a Jackrabbit. That is something we can all do
making people feel welcome and they are part of the Jackrabbit
family. Other things you can do, accept
campus visit appointments from the office of admissions and do
a great job in promoting that your academic programs have to
offer those students. As faculty member, in
particular, department heads, Deans, what you say and taking
the time to sit down and meet with a student one-on-one that
matters, that matters a lot to the
prospective students and families that you have taken
time out of your day to meet with them and share the exciting
things that are happening, so I think that
is a couple of things we can all do to welcome the students and make
them feel like they are part of the Jackrabbit family. There are
admission events that we would love you to be part of, when
you’re out there with your family, talking about South
Dakota state and the wonderful things we are doing here as a
university. Inviting people to visit campus, sharing what we do
with them that word of mouth makes a difference. When we talk
to students, prospective students and their family, word
of mouth is a big deal in how they find
out about South Dakota State University and decide to come
for the campus visit, so talking to your kids about it, talking
to their teachers, talking to the principal about the value of a four-year degree
at South Dakota university those are things that you can do in
order to spread the word about the positive things that are
happening. Also, wear the yellow and blue
wherever you go. [LAUGHTER]
>>Dennis Hedge: If I may, I want to touch on the retention
side real quick. Here we are at the end of an academic year. I’m
going to ask you to think about the way we started our academic
year. In August, we had a session,
maybe you don’t remember, we had a session and talked about the
things that we can do, right, things we can do that can make
an impact in regard to to the
retention side and there were four or five different
strategies. Some were as simple as helping
students feel their way, helping them find purpose or meaning in
what they are learning about, helping them feel connected to
the university by getting to know them, even first names and little things like that there is
a lot of evidence that says that makes a big difference. Challenging our students,
pushing them, they want action academic challenge, but they
also want us to work with them to make sure we’re helping them
get over the higher academic hurdles. If you think back, I thought it
was a wonderful way to begin the
academic year and maybe your homework exercise would be to
reflect back on the way we started our academic year. I
think there were helpful hints during that session and, again,
as Michaela said a lot of this is not overly complicated but
it requires intentional effort. I know we do that but it is like anything else in human nature
there is a little bit of slippage when we get a little
bit busy. Thanks for asking the question.>>Most of the comments today
were on the teaching side, as far as the budget is concerned.
. There any comments of the
research or extension side?>>Thanks, Paul. I will turn that over to Vice President in economic and
development.>>Thank you, Paul. Certainly, an education and
research aren’t separable from one another. They impact one another in a lot
of ways in both directions and what happens with
education-related revenues has an impact on research because to
some degree that underwrites some
aspects or part of the research and scholarship that we do, but as far as budget
and appropriations go, number one this year for research and extension, it
was a good thing that we came out out
of the legislative session without a loss and plus ups in key areas that will
feed into research. I want to go back to the project
list, the capital project list that
was addressed earlier. The animal disease and
diagnostic lab provost Hedge described that as
a game changer for a lot of reasons and one of the reasons
is in the name of that is the animal disease research and
diagnostic lab and it is thought about as the diagnostic lab but as he
will tell you in a heartbeat the
research and diagnostics goes together. The fact is, materials coming in
for diagnostics feed research and the research turns around
and enables diagnostics and the research fed by the diagnostic
material coming in is very responsive research, responsive
to the disease problems that are
unfolding in real time in reality and
represent a real and prevent need by the population that this university and this
diagnostic lab, the university has the
privilege of running serves, so that is very
important. In fact, a lot of our research
success, our outstanding, historical and current research
success at South Dakota State University is related to animal
health and that will continue to be the
case as we move into this space that
enables greater input of diagnostic
material and working with diagnostic material
with infectious agents under safe conditions. Safe for the
operators, safe for the environment outside of the
laboratory, for those who are familiar with bio safety levels,
we are talking about bio safety level three so that is
pretty special. A broader picture than that. This will be an agriculture
example and a broader picture of that, the funding landscape at the federal
level is a long term project. We think about it we submit
proposals and if they are proposals that
right lane high quality and resonate
with the scientific picture if you will and members of the
review panels and they are successful proposals but
even before that it starts with decisions that are made in Congress, as far as
authorization for programs, followed by budgeting, followed
by appropriations it is after that third step that money gets into the agency’s budgets with
which they can run competitive research programs. This last year, so in the fall,
the current version of the farm bill was passed and we, as a university
has the privilege of being involved in that and many of you
have heard this story already, if you get tired of it, too bad.
This is important. That was funny. You can laugh. I heard a chuckle behind me so
that was good. Early on in the farm bill negotiation process
over a year before Congress passed the farm bill, we were
working with members of Congress and
with some folks in the USDA to insert language that is relevant to SDSU
strengths and relevant to the population that
we serve on the subject of soil health. The result was soil health
language was introduced into the farm bill partly because of our involvement in
three different places of the farm bill. On Monday of next
week, I have an appointment, you don’t know this
yet, so I will miss the senior leadership team meeting, with three of the
writers about how to craft the regulations that implement the
farm bill provisions in such a way that South Dakota and northern great plains users can
most benefit and, of course, right in
there will be how to partner with land grant universities
that sets up competitive programs that our faculty, our
research and extension faculty can
successfully compete for, so those are some
of the big-picture things we’re doing
and have set faculty up. The key remains and this is a very
important message, it is one thick to submit proposals, it is another
thing to turn the proposals into awarded grants and contracts and
that is where you at the level of your units have to
engage and be strategic how expertise and time is a located so we just don’t submit
proposals, but we submit proposals where the effort has been applied to make them competitive proposals so
the work can be carried out and you will
see more on converting proposals to
awards, very, very important.>>Paul, I think it is a
fabulous question. Certainly the drop in revenue
this year was associated with a drop in
student credit hours, so the major
impact of the cuts is on academics and I think we have
done a good job. I’m sure there will be some impact on research,
but I think we have done a good job protecting, if you will,
research and extension. Lots of activities, Paul, in
great cancer work and pharmacy and
they built a new lab, so we expanded the
lab resources there. A new experimental in stir guess
that is why we are selling some land and moving on the extension side,
moving the western AG center into a new
building and high profile space, selling resources to position us
for the future. It is exciting stuff that is all across the
state, Paul. On the research side, I’m proud
of the natural resource management team
and bio systems engineering. Had a demonstration project on
the impact — positive impact of precision agriculture and the
potential of that on the impact of natural resources and we use that mod to model to leverage into a grant
and that will be leveraged for many
dollars more for pheasants and ducks and our
team has a big part in showcasing
precision AG’s impact on our environment, the positive impact precision AG can
have on the environment, so 40,000 acres of demonstration,
probably one of the greatest demonstration projects, Paul,
that we have ever had, so lots of exciting things. Does that make sense?>>Good afternoon. Joe Santos, department of
economics, school of management economics. I want to piggyback on Andrea’s question, if I may in the
context of research. What do we do to preserve the cull of the culture of the book? Stanford University press was
two days away from sacking or Stanford
University was two days away from sacking Stanford University
press this week. In that cultural environment, what can we do as an university to
preserve the culture of literary studies? You wouldn’t think this value
proppization would be as difficult to make as it seems to
be. Our democracy and life as we
know it depends on preserving this and I would like to know
how this university can behave to succeed in this way.>>I don’t have all of the
answers, Joe, I will give it a shot. As I have interacted with
literally fortune 100 companies about and
getting really strong and honest feedback about what our
graduates need to kind of look like, what skills they need to
have, certainly there is just an
assumption that they are mature, that they
understand everything that your team teaches in e-trading room. There is an assumption whether
the skill level is there, but what they are looking for and
this is — I’m ready to do battle on diversity, I will
tell you. What I are looking for communication skills, team skills,
participation in in the democracy and understanding the
world around them so diversity is mentioned over and over
again, the importance of a world view. Have they gone on a study
abroad? Have they traveled abroad that
is kind of the expectation that our students would have traveled
abroad, understand the world around them in this complex
world, understand religion and governments, et cetera, and
that’s what they are looking for. They expect the rest. They
are looking for the icing on the cake, which is what I think you described and last week at the
council of trustees meeting, one of the
alums who is a council of the trustees talked about her experience at SDSU
being a portal to the world and just an incredible quote that is
how she described it and that is what employers are looking for of our graduates
that is what we are all looking for. What I worry about, if we leave
those kids in Sioux Falls out of the
equation, our democracy is at risk. 40% of the kids doing nothing,
no offense to McDonald’s, going to
work at McDonald that is not healthy for
our democracy and society. We need people ready to
participate in councils. The pressure I feel is for more
of it and better communicators, having a richer understanding,
all of those trips to China that will start next week and across — that is what they are
looking for and that’s where the future
is, so I think if we stay strong and
articulate every chance you get. I articulate it every chance I
get. It is a great question. I leave it to others, too.>>I can’t pass up the
opportunity and thank you for the question, Joe. I think you asked what can we,
as the university do and us as
individuals in our various roles of leadership and being on the front lines with
engaging with students and engaging with ideas that is the
research and creativity function of a faculty member in a phrase,
I would say never give up on the scholarship. Work really, really
hard, no matter what the teaching challenges
are, no matter what the enrollment
challenges are, never give up on the scholarship. I think we
should discipline ourselves to not view education and
scholarship as competing things. Yes, we only have so much time
to allocate, but these two things feed one another to be at their best,
they have to depend on one another. I challenge all of us
to think about, what can we do differently to
elevate our scholarship and creative activity, so I’m
thinking of the arts and humanity when I use that vocabulary and
that includes doing things that are different, doing things that
are new and trying new things and for many that may be looking for sponsorships that
enable work that couldn’t be done
otherwise so when it is difficult, when it is not part of our habit, when it is
not part of our normal way of working but never give up on scholarship that is
the fire, so to speak. >>Joe, I will pick that up
again. Sorry to hone in on you, it is
to everybody. Having a robust faculty is
absolutely key. One of the case statements that we have made
about the next capital campaign for the university in partnership
with the SDSU foundation is to go from
our last goal in our last strategic plan was to have 16 endowed positions,
right, Steve, and we’re at 21 now. Our goal is 50. We want to enhance faculty to
celebrate them, bring resources to it that is one way to do it because that buys
time and buys summer experiences for the
faculty, so how does it manifest itself? What are we doing about
it? We’re making it a big priority in the next capital campaign when we
visit with donors and what is an
endowed position, why does it matter in management or economics, Joe, so
let’s go for 75, I mean let’s not stop
at 50.>>David Davis, I’m from the
school of management in economics. So we know that enrollment
numbers are down, we have initiatives
underway for a few years now to reduce
retention and graduation rates, can we speak
to those numbers?>>While Michaela is coming up,
I will tell you about graduation rates. Last year, we awarded more
degrees than we ever awarded before in a
12-month period because duel credit and
128 and I remember visiting with Don Marshall about this, we sped
up the awarding of degrees so on one measure we’re very
efficient. We awarded 2,600-something
awards and we have fewer kids on campus so
it is a con conundrum. I will turn it
over to Michaela and shut up here. Which one is it?
Four-year graduation rate is going up, which is a good thing, but that
lowers enrollment versus this is the
best five or six years of your life that
is gone. But the price tag of that is
what Rob brought up, it impacted our business model.
>>Michaela Willis: I think the other thing I will share, if you look
at the enrollment plan there are a number of priorities focused
on retention and student success, which to me is
commencement and graduation. As you look at that, our student
success committee has been working hard all year to really evaluate and
start to make recommendations forward on how we can start to move those metrics
in new and different ways, so they are looking at high-impact practice, what
works at South Dakota State University and how can we do more of what works
here at the university. They have been digging into some of
the numbers. I know our student success
center has been looking at how to enhance
— I’m going to get the name of it wrong but the EAB platform connects state,
how can we use that in new and better
ways to really reach out to the students and get them in and
talk to them about how we can keep you here and help you
continue to succeed. Some of the scholarship optimization work that has been
focused on how to get students the
scholarships they need, how do they leave the semester confidence in their
financial aid packages so they are ready
for the fall semester. We are doing things around the
scholarship process to feel that confidence so when I come back
in the fall, I will have financial aid and scholarships
and this is what it will look like. These are the different
things we are looking around the student initiatives. We are
looking at the first-year experience, what are the
learning outcomes, how are we achieving the learning outcomes
and the student success committee is doing a lot of work
around that front, so those are a few of the things we’re
emphasizing and Dennis may have some things to add to that as
well.>>Dennis Hedge: Thanks,
Michaela. Just in fact today, we had the
folks from EAB here, so Jodi and Mary
Kay sitting in there again on a strategy meeting, basically how
we can better continue to evolve and utilize
connect state and our platforms. We did see a reduction in the year-over-year retention rate,
that being said, there is a lot of
new strategies being implemented. The President asked
me on where we’re sitting on retention numbers, so we’re all
anxious to get that. One thing, we got this far
without mentioning banner, but I’m going to mention it, Mike.
As we convert, right, it is difficult for us to get information so
that is one challenge we have right now. I wish it wasn’t the challenge
we have but we’re working through it. It is difficult for
us but I’m optimistic about other thing,
mobile application, other things like
that. Mobile platform associated with banner, so what we can do
that way and interacting with students sending subtle
reminders, sometimes not so subtle reminders in that regard
that can be helpful as we look at a comprehensive plan at
driving retention. The last thing and I mentioned
the comprehensive campaign a couple of times already. Again, the comprehensive
campaign also, I want to do a call out, a
person-centered campaign and the elements, if you see that, if
you take a look at the overarching case statement, you will see a call out in
regard to retention efforts. We know the factors. It is tutoring and supplemental instructions but it is also
about things that make — that become
impactful in the way students are navigating our campus in a good state or not,
if you will. Mental health and wellness and all of those things
are critical components, so the wellness center expansion
because key part of that, I think. If we continue to do that and
through the comprehensive campaign,
hopefully we can add additional resources I think that is what
it is going to take to hit the 80% target, so I just wanted
to add that as well. So the question was about
international student and retention and recruitment right
now, so a great question. Right now, looking at Greg here
as well, so that is an area we’re trying new strategyies. What we anticipate is our
international student enrollment number next year will be smaller than this past year,
now that being said, we’re going to graduate a larger class and
we believe what we’re going to bring in is smaller than what we graduate that is going to be
the primary reason for this.>> Question from the audience —
away from the mic.>>Dennis Hedge: You will see a
lot of strategies and the retention numbers have been solid, as far as that
goes. We’re working hard to implement
new strategies around student recruitment in addition to rusty
who has been recruiting and we’re engaged in new strategies
and other agents to bring new students to our campus
associated with their efforts overseas, so trying to do that and identify other
partnerships, I can mention that as another strategy. Greg, Mary Kay and I have been
on a variety of calls when we’re
looking at groups, trying to open up new
programs, three plus one-type programs and
Dean wolf hall will be joining us on a call as we try to
explore additional opportunities that we believe will open up new
doors to international students. Does that help a little bit?
Thanks.>>A couple of things on the
outreach and extension, first there’s a
new web portal for SDSU extension. Extension .SDstate. EDU so a much more friendly
program than what we launched six years ago. What? Nine years
ago? [LAUGHTER]
>>It was just yesterday. [LAUGHTER]>>Great work by the extension
team to get a new portal, very easy to
use and we’re excited about it. Reaching more people than there
are in this state, reaching people all
around the globe with unbiased scientific information, right,
Lindsey? Sorry. Really proud of that work and on
the other side, the aviation faculty
next week are flying, just like they did last year, flying planes out to
Cheyenne river to take kids from the middle school on plane rides around the
Cheyenne river reservation and they are taking their simulator — flight
simulator and driving it out and if you have driven to eagle butte it is
a long drive, especially if you’re pulling a trailer, isn’t
it, Paul? To engage and expand their world
view in an exciting way. They did not ask for money or
permission. They are just doing it and doing a great job. Matt
Miller and others from chemistry went down to Marty Indian school
and spent the day doing crazy science and the videos are
incredible watching these kids faces, so great outreach
into some underserved populations that warms my heart
and I appreciate it. Again, Matt didn’t ask permission. He just
went out and did it because it is the right thing to do so lots
and lots of other outreach examples that impact this state
and I think you will be proud of. I hope you follow the Monday
morning message and I hope you’re motivated to in terms of above and beyond and
I hope you will nominate your peer or
fellow faculty member or whoever and we
would like to — we should be doing
that every day is celebrating all of the great work that is done on this campus
above and beyond, but that is two cool examples that you might
not know about and outstanding work refreshing the main extension portal to SDSU. Other
questions? Oh, there is Becky. Other questions? I can out wait you. David, how is the new digs?
>>David: We love them. I will give you a 50 Cent tour.>>So you just finished your
third year, what are a couple of exciting things you’re looking
forward to the next couple of years?>>Rob asked I just — last week
would have been the third anniversary of when I was President of SDSU.
[APPLAUSE]>>Thanks, I was asked last week
by a friend, I don’t know, maybe it
wasn’t a friend, I don’t know, asked how it was going and I
said it was the most exciting time of my life and that is
absolutely true. It has been the most rewarding time of my life. I thought teaching was —
teaching for me up until now had been the most rewarding thing I
have ever done, but now this is really incredible. It is great
to serve you. It is great to serve the state. It is great to
have a voice at the table for things that I hope I
represent you on about important missions, Joe, that you brought
up and others have brought up. It has been quite a three years
and I’m glad to have Jane by my side
helping me out. The next three years, I think
the American Indian student center
is grabbing the attention of all of the policymakers in the state and in
the nation, too, this is — nobody
has every done this before. Certainly there are American
Indian student centers at other campus, but no one has been this intensional
about this effort and once we get that center opened up, it will just help us
all understand history in a more
inclusive and accurate way and I think we will go into the next
century better prepared to deal with those challenges that have
been haunting us here in South Dakota for a long time, so that is one
of them. I’m very excited about the brand awareness of SDSU and a lot of
it is — we have 500 student athletes
that represent us so well, not only
in their athletic performance but their academic performance but behavior, all
three, great young men and women, so
excited about improving the brand image of this university,
Rob. There have been two, I get a kick out of this one, two identical
market analysis of our brand versus other brands and we have the highest
brand recognition in this region, we have extremely high
brand recognition and much higher than USD and for me
that is a DUH, of course, we do. That is mean. It is how I feel. I think, Rob, the vision is to
be a premier university and own that and I encourage everyone to
own that and what does that look like for you in the next three years and what does it
look like it for me? If you don’t don’t think we are premier, then
help guess it there, so that is our
goal and our challenge is to be a premier university and that is my vision
and have it not debatable when the mechanical engineering kids just
— the bot shot, this is my favorite of
the spring. Mike barber isn’t here but we
were running mates for six or seven years raising money for the SDSU
foundation and we asked landa lakes for a
large donation and we were told we are
not a tier one university and they would not give us any money so they only
gave money to tier one universities like university of
Minnesota. At the basketball tournament, they had the bot
shot, which was a competition that landa lakes sponsored for engineering students to build a
robot. It is computer science and what
else, Bruce? So three or four departments,
and it was made possible by one day for
state, Steve, $10,000. We took $10,000 to enter and I’m going
to get this wrong, Bruce, but this great team of kids built a robot to
shoot a basketball in the hoop. We competed against other
universities, including the University of Minnesota,
sponsored by landa lakes and we won and we
got $10,000 so that is my vision for the university, great academics,
great brand recognition, lots of pride, lots
of blue and yellow and everyone working for their success. On that, thanks for the
softball. I want to echo Dennis’ comments,
thank you so much for a great year. It is a great nine months.
Time is flying by. Lots of success, having 2,200
scholarships awarded to incoming freshman before Christmas all
scholarships awarded for young people coming back next fall awarded by
April 15. We had a lot of great targets
and super accomplishments by student
athletes and academic performances at professional
meetings and societal meetings. I couldn’t be prouder of you and
thanks to all you do for all of the
kids and I will see you Saturday for graduation.>>I want to follow-up on
something you just commented, you talked about being a first
class tier one university and many of you may have seen today
the Ness School of management and
economics, what they may not realize we were the only one
land grant university without a business school in the country
and so if you’re striving to be a top-class university and to be among our
peers in our land grant university, I think we want to
recognize the hard work that is done by you and the provost in prioritizing this above a lot of
other well-deserving issues, but that
was many decades of diplomacy and
politics that went into doing that. If we an to strive to be the
best that is what it is taken to go up
against some of those norms, politics to
make chose things happen and I think
we owe you. Thanks for being able to do
that. [APPLAUSE]>>I’m particularly proud of
provost hedge. As an interim provost, he got a
degree in business economics that
130-something years no provost has ever done
and I couldn’t be prouder of him and it is great work, Dennis.
>>Dennis Hedge: I appreciate that but as we all know there
are so many people involved in that and I wish Mary Kay was here, too, what a trusted,
amazing colleague she is to me. I know you all know that and I
get the great benefit of that but
anyway, thank you, President but there are so
many people’s hands in that stuff. It is teamwork but it is fun to
get closer to our lofty goals.>>Just think of landa lakes and
that robot. [LAUGHTER]>>I will stay as long as you
want to but people have other lives. Thank you so much for a
great year. Have a great summer and I’ll see
you all summer but look forward to
working with you on other great things. Talk to you soon.
[APPLAUSE]


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