FFA Poultry Judging: Class 7 – Interior Egg Quality

FFA Poultry Judging: Class 7 – Interior Egg Quality


>>This is FFA Poultry Judging:
Class 7 – Interior Egg Quality This is Grade AA Quality. To properly candle an egg,
we take the egg and put the large side
straight into the aperture where the light
is coming out. We never turn
the egg on its side, because you cannot
see the air cell. This is the
proper technique and you can clearly
see the air cell. Because this air cell
is very small, 1/8-inch of less in depth,
it is a AA Quality egg. Next, spin the egg
while up to the aperture watching the yolk go
around inside the egg. Do this from both
ends of the egg and look for
blood spots or meat spots. If there are none,
then grade the egg by the size
of the air cell. As the egg sits
in storage, the larger the
air cell will become. As we look at this egg
we can see that it is an A Grade
because the air cell is between 1/8-inch in depth
and 3/16-inch in depth. Students should practice
looking at air cells with a ruler to master
the ability to judge the grade based on the
depth of the air cell. Next, as with the previous egg,
it is spun and the yolk is watched to ensure that there
are no blood or meat spots. If there are none,
then the grade is based on
air cell depth. There are no blood
or meat spots in this egg. It is an A Grade. As the egg is stored
for even longer periods, air will seep into the
air cell making it larger. This egg has deteriorated
to a Grade B egg because the air cell is
larger than 3/16-inch in depth. When this egg is spun,
it looks like there is a possible blood spot. However, this is dirt
on the surface of the shell and does not move when
the egg is spun around. Because there are no blood
or meat spots in this egg, this is a Grade B egg. Notice the dirt spot there. Students should consider
three yolk factors when evaluating egg quality:
the yolk size and shape, the distinctness
of yolk shadow outline, and yolk defects
and germ development. The yolk of a freshly
laid egg is round and firm. As the yolk ages,
it absorbs water from the albumen
and increases in size. This weakens the
vitelline membrane and gives the yolk a
somewhat flattened shape on top and a general
out of round shape. The yolk membranes
and tissues have weakened causing the yolk
to appear definitely enlarged and flattened,
that would be a B Quality egg. There are three factors
that govern the distinctness of the yolk outline
or shadow outline: thickness and
consistency of albumen. The thicker the albumen,
the less distinct the outline. The condition of the yolk. The presence or absence
of blemishes showing up before the candling light
as dark shadows in the yolk determines its condition. And the color of the yolk. Except for off color,
yolk color is difficult to determine when candling. However, extremes in yolk
color may influence the candler’s judgment
of egg quality. There are three degrees
of distinctness of yolk shadow outline. Outline slightly defined. That means the yolk outline
is indistinctly indicated and appears to blend into
the surrounding white as the egg is twirled. That would be AA Quality. Outline fairly well defined. The yolk outline
is discernible, but not clearly outlined
as the egg is twirled. That’s A Quality. Or outline
plainly visible. That means the yolk
outline is clearly visible as a dark shadow
when the egg is twirled. That’s B Quality egg. The yolk defects are
defined as follows: Practically free from defects. This means the yolk shows
no germ development, but may show other very
slight defects on its surface. This is for both AA
and A Quality of eggs. Serious defects. The yolk shows
well developed spots or areas and other
serious defects such as olive yolks
that do not cause the egg to be a loss egg. This would be considered
a B Quality defect. Clearly visible
germ development. Development of the
germ spot on the yolk of a fertile egg has
progressed to the point where it is
plainly visible. That’s a definite
circular area or spot, but with no blood
in evidence. This makes the
egg a B Quality. Finally, when blood caused
by development of the germ in a fertile egg appears
as definite lines or as a blood ring
this is considered a loss egg. Terms to describe
the egg white: Clear. The white is free from
discoloration or foreign bodies. This would be for
AA and A Qualities. It is important for students
not to misinterpret a prominent chalaza
as a foreign body. The egg white may be firm,
where it’s thick enough to prevent the yolk
outline from being more than slightly defined
when the egg is twirled. That’s a AA Quality. Reasonably firm. The white is somewhat
less thick than a firm white and that would
be an A Quality. It could be
weak and watery. The white is weak, thin
and lacking in viscosity. This is a B Quality. Blood spots
or meat spots. If the spots are small,
aggregating not more than 1/8-inch in diameter,
the egg is B Quality. If large or
showing diffusion of blood in the white
surrounding the blood spot, the egg is a loss egg. It may have a bloody white. The egg has blood defused
throughout the white. Freshly laid eggs
may have this condition. This is a loss egg. This is an excellent example
of an egg with a blood spot. A blood spot smaller
than 1/8-inch in length makes the egg
a B Grade. Whereas a blood spot that
is larger than 1/8-inch makes the egg
a loss egg. © 2012 University of Georgia
College of Agricultural and
Environmental Sciences


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