Huntsman Young Alumni Panel – Sales Skills for Every Career – November 4, 2016

Huntsman Young Alumni Panel – Sales Skills for Every Career – November 4, 2016


(Bone): I just wanted to extend a warm welcome
to our to our panel. I’m professor Sterling Bone, professor of marketing and
the director of the Huntsman Sales Academy. Which you can see here in the room, we have a lot of our Huntsman Pro-Sales students that are here with us, so
welcome to all of you. And special welcome to our panelists on behalf
of the Huntsman School. So let’s welcome our panel. The format for this session is
designed to be a little bit less formal, more interactive and so I would like the
panel to quickly kind of take a couple minutes and just introduce each of them
to you as students. What about their background, what they’re currently doing and we’ll start with David. (Lee): Hi guys, I am excited to be here my name is David Lee I represent Qualtrics,
obviously. I am an alumni as of a year so a lot has changed between when i graduated in December and now. And this is my first time back so I’m really
excited to be here, I’m really excited to have the opportunity to chat with you
guys, I’m excited for the opportunity to see some of these resources in the new
building. And you guys are really extremely lucky, I hope you recognize
what you have here because it’s evolved an incredible amount in the amount of
time that I’ve been gone. And either way I’m really happy to be here. So far as
you know, my background and what I’m coming into this with, I’ve been
with Qualtrics now for seven months so relatively new, right. Been out of school
for 11 started with Qualtrics in March and in that period of time I’ve held a
couple of roles. And I started out in a program that’s designed really to help
transition into the next stage. It was called opportunity to development now
called sales development, essentially the the focus of that program and that
opportunity is to help you to learn how to generate leads and build a pipeline
and connects you with Sales Account Executives in preparation for you to fill that role in the future. And I’ve recently
transitioned from that role into an account executive role as of a month so
I’m still pretty new to that but it’s been an absolutely awesome experience.
I’ve learned so much, I’ve developed in so many ways and I love Qualtrics. And I
think a lot of you probably had the opportunity in the hour previous to this
to listen to Stewart, one of the founders over at Qualtrics and to get a lot of
insight into Qualtrics and the growth that’s happened there and the
opportunities that exist there. So I think what I can contribute to this
panel is predominantly just my experience transitioning from the stage
that you’re currently in, into the workforce, into a career, and being able
to share any experience that I was able to pick up through my own experience. So
that’s where I’m at. I came from a background selling door-to-door at
Vivint, actually. I spent four years, the four years that I was here at school,
selling security door to door and that kind of opened up my eyes to the
opportunities that exists, so far as sales are concerned. I changed my major
after my first year knocking doors to marketing because I knew it would give
me an opportunity to expand my skill set and open up some doors for the career
path that I ultimately ended up pursuing. And it’s been an awesome experience so
far. So looking forward to chatting with you guys. (Goldheart): Alright, good morning everyone. It’s good to be with you. My name is Tom Goldheart. It’s great to see what my increase
in tuition contributed to and this beautiful building. I am at Instructure.
I’m an enterprise account executive selling bridge. You’re probably familiar
with Canvas, you use that every day, that’s our academic learning management system. Bridge is our corporate learning management system for corporate learning
and development. Excited to be here, I’ve been out of school for a couple years and
have had a couple a few different opportunities with selling different
products, different roles. So happy to share my experience with you and looking
forward to answering some questions. (Whittaker): Good morning everybody, my name is David Whittaker. I’m from a little startup, you may have heard of it, AT&T. And I’ve been
graduated in 2013 so been out of school about three years now, all with AT&T. It’s
been a wonderful experience. Exactly this time three years ago I was in your shoes
getting a job offer from AT&T. So just driving back to Logan this is the first
time I’ve been back here. Beautiful, new facilities and building here. And a lot
of memories came flooding back, you know finishing up school and preparing to
enter the workforce as well. So excited to be here and chat with you guys as
well and yeah. (Apatchin): My name is Morgan Apatchin and I actually just graduated in May so I got to enjoy this for like maybe a month and
then I was out of here. So it’s good to be back. My background is that I never had
an interest in sales. I mean I really never did. And I was totally interested
in marketing and advertising and all that stuff and I got talked into doing a
summer sales job for three years and then I happened upon Sterling and he
kind of introduced me to sales and slowly but surely converted me along the
way and so now I work in sales at a company called Henrickson Butler. It
sounds like a law firm or something but it’s a furniture and interior
design firm down in Salt Lake. They actually did help design and furnish all
of Huntsman Hall. So the chairs we’re sitting in, we did that. So I’ve been
there. I actually started as an intern while I was still in school and they
were really flexible with me so I basically drove all the way down to salt
lake every other weekend to work with them. I met them when I was in one of
Sterling’s classes so it just kind of evolved slowly but surely. And I
interviewed like crazy and told them I don’t know where I’m going to go and
they said okay well here’s an offer and then I ended up deciding to stay with
them and I started officially full time in September. So I’ve been there about a
year. But that’s my background. (Baugh): Hey guys, glad to be with you I’m Jason Baugh. I’m with, I’m the district manager of Vivint Solar up here in northern Utah. I
grew up here in Hyrum, so me and Sterling have a little connection there, he’s
living in Hyrum right now which is a cool little spot if you’ve been out
there. Built the house up here just up by Kevin Rice if you guys know him, he
works up here, lives in North Logan, and my background is a little bit different
than a regular Vivint sales rep. I was a I was a sales rep for Burton
Snowboards before this and even before that worked at Al’s Sporting Goods for four years. So I don’t know how I came from the snowboard industry into the
summer sales type of an industry but the thing I like about Vivint solar is we’ve
transitioned to a year-round program it’s not necessarily a summer sales
program like what most people think of Vivint. My office is in Ogden it’s the
hub for northern Utah and we work every day. It’s more of a professional type of
a sale where we’re with the customer multiple times, three to five times
throughout a three-month process. And so we get to know the customer really
really well and I feel like it’s the grown up to Vivint. I kind of feel like, I
mean it’s just a little bit different feel, so it’s not a slam in your face,
it’s more of a professional type of feel. And that’s what I really like and that’s
why I’m with Vivint Solar. So that’s a little bit of my background. (Bone): First questions to the panel, I’d like you to kind of paint a picture of it what’s the typical day like for you in your job. In
the audience we have students that are becoming more and more familiar with sales, are coming from different backgrounds. Maybe talk
about what is a typical day on your job Maybe we’ll start here with Jason. (Baugh): So typical day could be a little bit crazy but I like to start with the end in mind.
So this is a very crucial part of having a successful day is starting
at night and planning out exactly what you want to accomplish the following day.
If I don’t do that I’m completely lost and things are not going to happen so
that’s where I start my day. And I even start my week at typically eight o’clock
on Sunday night. I know I try not to work very much on Sunday but I feel like that
is a huge huge factor in accomplishing what you need to make happen for the
week so that’s where I start. Following that, obviously waking up about 7-7:30 so
it’s not super early but I’m usually working pretty darn late so very right
from the get-go is emails and responding to what needed to happen and putting
people in motion for what needs to take place during that day. And then I’ll get
out and get with the team, run a team meeting, and then we get the announcements and updates and everything moving for the day and then I’m out
training, hiring, and dealing with my own customers in my own situation. So that’s
that’s kind of a typical day for me. But it’s it’s always just it’s it feels like
a lot the same but it’s and it has the same structure to it which is really
really important but it can take so many twists and turns. But if you don’t have
that basic structure and that basic foundation that you stick to, you won’t
be able to deal with the craziness of a career and different things that get
thrown at you on a daily basis. (Apatchin): So my day is never the same. I would say the stuff that is really true sales there is a lot of time spent doing
traditional calling, following up on leads, emailing, all that good stuff. I try
to get out of the office as much as possible and and really meet customers
in their space because especially what we do involves their space so it’s
really good to kind of see it. But that’s, it’s kind of a nitty-gritty stuff. The
fun stuff is that we kind of work with architects and interior designers and
construction people and so we work with a lot of different groups and we really
have to network within those specific groups to be successful. So a lot of what
we do is hosting events at our building, going to events at other buildings, we do
things called “Lunch and learns” where you basically just network and bring
somebody lunch like an architectural firm or something. So there’s a lot of
fun events involved and those really run the whole gamut. My company is really
great about sending us to conferences and any professional development
opportunities. So any awards ceremonies that honor businesses and things like
that, they always are open to sending us to those. And I also do a little bit, now
I’m transitioning into a new role starting next week where I’ll do a
little bit more lead generation. So I’m going to be a lot more on the digital
marketing side and so it’s going to be kind of fifty percent getting leads from
online sources through content and things like that and then fifty percent
following up on those leads and transferring those to the appropriate
salespeople. So it’s kind of a mix but no day is ever the same. (Whittaker): Okay I’m actually going to take your question sterling and branch it out to more of
like a week, what a week’s like. I also like to get out of the office as much as
possible but working for a fortune ten company oh there’s so many meetings and
so much admin work. And so Monday and Friday are typically kind of an
admin, team meeting day– lots of calls with upper leadership. You know, some customer appointments but really Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, I try to just get out
and see as many customers as possible. I’m in a moduled environment so I don’t
do a lot of cold calling. I have about 90 mid-market, mid-sized businesses in
Northern Nevada Tahoe region and a lot of my customers you know I can drive to
in a half hour or so. So the middle part of my week is just going out, seeing
customers, following up on previous appointments and just building up, I’m
sure you know, you know funnel management, building the funnel. And yeah lots of
calls, lots of meetings. The more you sell though however the more problems that
come and the more installation and billing issues. So there’s a lot of
juggling of topics. No sale goes unpunished. But it’s surely
fulfilling and rewarding. So that’s kind of a typical work week at AT&T for
me. (Goldheart): So I’ll take the same approach with a work week. So there’s obviously, there’s
different stages of the sales cycle. And so throughout the week I’ll be meeting
with potential customers that I’m trying to obviously close and bring on as
customers. And so there’s a lot of strategizing, internal discussions with
different teams that will be involved with winning their business. So there’s a
lot of that goes on. Customer facing meetings so demos of the product,
the initial discovery calls, all sorts of meetings with the decision makers. So the
meetings with the customers I would say that takes up the majority of my work
week. I get out, so my territory is the Midwest and so I’m Texas all the way up
to Canada. And so i try to get out to have on on-site presentations a couple
times a month and so there’s a lot of preparation that goes into that as well.
There’s a lot of internal type meetings just like David mentioned there’s a lot
of team meetings. My typical work week is working with the opportunity development
or the business development team who’s sending more prospects into my sales
pipeline, so understanding who these people are, what they’re looking for,
preparing for the first time that I’ll be meeting with them, so there’s just
like it had been mentioned earlier, every day is different. That’s what I love about
sales. It’s different, it doesn’t get boring, you’re working with different
companies with different challenges, looking for different types of solutions.
So it’s really exciting, fast-paced but as mentioned earlier as well the
preparation and the priority prioritization and the
scheduling all of all that really goes into making a successful work week. But
hopefully that kind of gives you an idea of what I typically do on a day-to-day
basis. (Lee): So in structuring Qualtrics, fairly similar not necessarily in industry but
so far as the companies are operating what a sales position might look like at
those two organizations- pretty similar. So as far as what I do on a day-to-day
basis what Tom just described would be very very close to that. Tom had worked
at Qualtrics and moved over to Instructure, similar background right.
What I think I’ll focus on is you transitioning from school into a career
what you can kind of expect initially right out of the gates is at least in an
organization like Qualtrics is for the first few months, and we can say six
months is kind of a an average estimation, what the company would
dedicate that time toward usually would be really helping you number one to
learn how to leverage the tools that they will provide you. Linkedin sales
navigator, Salesforce, some of these platforms that you’ve probably heard of
but maybe never had any direct experience with, they’re going to
dedicate that time to training to help you get up and running as quickly as
possible. When they bring you on they invest a lot of money in you to the
point obviously they’re investing in you until you can become a
profit Center for them and drive revenue for
them. And so you’re going to take part in a lot of trainings that are designed not
only to help you learn the tools that are going to be effective, help you to be
effective, but also to learn the products of the companies that you’re going to be
using right. At instructure it’s a different product than at Qualtrics. It’s
going to take time, there’s a learning curve to be able to master those
products in such a way that you can present yourself professionally in a
corporate environment when you’re working with VPS and c-level executives
at these organizations and finding challenges that they’re facing and
working as a really in a consultative manner to help position your products in
such a way that you’re going to address those needs and fix organizational wide
problems. So that that’s a lot of it. You’re obviously going to spend a lot of
time at least in the software space doing lead generation where you are
mining contacts, you’re jumping on Linkedin, you’re spending time
researching these types of individuals, pulling up organizations, looking at
specific job titles, doing what you can to pull from their profiles, anything
that’s going to be applicable in a conversation when you cold contact them.
I do a lot of cold contacting. Probably three to four hours every day committed
specifically to making phone calls and then setting up, lining up additional
conversations where you can dive a little bit deeper into their current
situation and the challenges that they’re facing. So at least right out of
the gates for the first six months if I were to tell you what to expect at least
so far as Qualtrics is concerned as well as a lot of these other software
platforms, a lot of your day will be lead generation, preparing, learning, working
toward transitioning into a role where you have the opportunity to dive deeper
and further into meetings where you’re demoing the product and where you’re
bringing on teams on their side and your side and being able to pilot these types
of really big deals right million-dollar deals sometimes. So that’s what I’ve
experienced in the first six months and have recently transitioned out of that
and for that I kind of relay that to you because that’s what you could expect at
a lot of these organizations here in Silicon slopes, right. (Bone): Thank you. It invites the students to view sales from one of two perspectives, maybe think about doing sales as a fall-back position, kind of
forced to do sales, right. I mean there’s data to suggest that the vast majority
of college students whether you graduate in the business school environment or other environments, you would end up getting a sales role at some point in your career.
But i think we made a shift here at Huntsman, to make sales as a choice.
So I’d like to kind of maybe open it up to the panel. Why sales? Right I know
these panelists pretty well to know that they made a choice to do since and
there’s probably individuals here they’re thinking not my dream job.
What would you say to the group here, why pursue sales? (Whittaker): So Sterling and I go back and, Lindsey, right? (Apatchin): Morgan. Close.(Whittaker): I’m so sorry, Morgan. I’m sorry. So like Morgan, I was in marketing
and I had a different dream you know I entered– I’m so sorry about that– I had
a dream, I came into graphic design when I first started, you know, had my new mac,
i was ready you know. I love art and you know I switched to marketing because I
thought i’d be a little more stable. I entered Sterling’s sales class and you
know there I was doing the role plays, getting all stressed out. I remember
those days. those are stressful man. And and you know I just, this
conversation began about sales and then I applied at AT&T more of just an
experience and a learning experience to go through that interview process and I
went through multiple multiple stages, did role plays, and was offered a job and
I never, I remember sterling and I went back and forth on you know what can a
career be like in sales, what opportunities are out there, and I will
say that you know i think there’s pros and cons in any position you do
and with sales it’s the same thing. The cons can be you know it’s a grind
month after month. It’s a grind. I think everyone would agree with that. Just
pushing, rejection and just you know going through those stages can be a
little strenuous. But I think also it can be so fulfilling. Financially for your
family it’s a great, it’s a great position to to take care of yourself in
your family financially. And then also my position, I don’t know about the others,
but it’s really flexible. So if I need to take care of things at home with
the kids, my wife, or just other duties, I can do that. I can work from home if I
want. And it really has opened up doors for future possibilities I think
as well and it just pushes you like Tom said. I mean you’re sitting in these
meetings in front of VPs, C levels, you’re scared to death and it is pushing
you to the max to to hone those skills to hone those sales skills, those human skills, having these relationships and it’s fun. So there’s my two cents. (Apatchin): Alright Sterling alright, I’m gonna be real candid with you guys okay. Super
transparent okay. I already said it in like the first 36 seconds I introduced
myself but um I had absolutely no desire to be in sales even when I did summer
sales I had no desire to do summer sales, I just really wanted money and I really
wanted to not work when I came back so I think I fought Sterling every step of
the way as he was trying to push me and say “you’re good at this” like “why
don’t you like this? you’re good at this” and I fought him every step of the way. I
said nope I want to be in an ad agency. So just by a show of hands how many
people here are marketing majors and you’re interested in true marketing?
A few? Okay and how many people are like no I really like sales. Okay so it’s
about 50-50 split. Alright so um for me I definitely had to make that choice.
Marketing and sales are going through a big change right now I think marketing
beforehand used to be a lot less technical and nowadays it’s kind of a
requirement that sales and marketing have to communicate. There aren’t these
silos anymore right and we’re seeing that as a growing pain in my own
organization, they’re trying to navigate that water too. And so for me I think as
I was interviewing like crazy I mean I would bug him all the time I’d say “I’m
interviewing here what do you think? “I’m interviewing here what do you think?” and
I would definitely recommend that. Interview and see what you like. I mean
you’re going to be able to tell pretty quickly when you walk into an
organization whether you see yourself fitting there or not. To be quite frank I
interviewed it just about every SAS company in Utah. I mean I was putting it
all out there. And um the more I met and I was looking at that type of selling role, I struggled with it. I was like man I don’t know if I’m the right
fit for this I don’t know if I can grind as hard as they want me to grind. I was
really intimidated by that, right, I mean he just testified, it is a grind. And so I
was absolutely terrified. I said no I just I just want to create cool stuff
and you know so I interviewed and interviewed and finally I found a place
that I felt like I had the right balance. And so I’d say be open-minded. I mean
selling is not everything that you think it is whether you’re Pro selling or
you’re not so sure about selling either way it’s not exactly what you think it’s
going to be and vice versa it’s going to be that way with any job. And so I think
just be open-minded and don’t rush yourself. Take some time and don’t let
other people pressure you too because a lot of my family was like “well salary,
salary is the most important thing obviously” and so I’m getting all this
pressure right it’s like well i gotta be at the biggest and best company and the
biggest and best role as possible and i think that pressure
is going to make you really unhappy. You know you have to do what you want to
do. No matter where you go if it’s not something you’re passionate about you’re
going to get burnt out. So find a place that you fit in with the people and
don’t worry so much about like the stigma about what that role is like what
that title is right like focus on the people and where you want to go and
your gut feeling when you go there. Sorry I was long-winded. So Brock asked me that
same thing right over here so why do I do this job every single day right
because door-to-door sales doing it every single day sounds like a nightmare
especially when you times up by nine years that’s ridiculous right I mean no
that doesn’t I mean if someone told me that right now said hey sign up for nine
years like I probably wouldn’t do it that doesn’t make sense but I love the
big picture right so it’s not necessarily like the grind is just part
of it and it’s totally fine but the reward is so awesome I love the big
picture of being able to make a difference and that’s what I feel like
I’m doing we can save a lot of people a lot of money it’s a newer way of doing
things it’s an industry that’s blowing up it’s growing at a twenty percent
growth rate right now don’t quote me on that who is it I think it’s even more
but anyways it’s really fun so I just like the big picture right so sales is
where you can really write your own ticket Brock likes the freedom and and I
think we can all agree that you can have freedom and with freedom comes a lot of
responsibility because you are you have that freedom so you need to make sure
that your clocked in and making sure you’re making it happen while you’re
clocked in because those other times when you can when you’re not being you
don’t have that manager watching over you you’re working at home like you were
saying right you have to have that big picture in mind so but also with cells
it is it is by far the best industry to be in because if you’re not selling and
then you’re then you’re losing right so you’re either gaining or you’re losing
with anybody with any conversation with any person with
interaction either you’re either gaining ground or you’re losing ground so at
that point even with your girlfriend or your wife or your kids or whatever the
case is you’ve got to be a good salesman the better salesman you are the better
relationships you’re going to have so whether that’s like directly related to
your paycheck or not you have to be good at sales if you want to be productive
and if you want to move up in any company no matter where you’re at or
what position you are specifically doing for that company uh so for me again I’m just going to be
really candid with you um when I interviewed at a bunch of SAS companies
I would say I narrowed it down I interviewed at probably 11-12 places my
senior year total and I narrowed it down to two two places and one of those was a
SAS position and that was the reason that I had narrowed it down was I I felt
exactly that now some people thrive under that pressure right some people
just do really well with people pushing them and saying look you gotta hit this
you got to hit this I realized very early on that I’m not one of those
people I realized that when I did door-to-door sales the days that I
compared myself to whoever got the highest number on the board I sold very
little and so for me I think it was about realizing that I am NOT that
person that thrives under that pressure cooker environment and so that was my
challenge was like okay you want to do sales and there’s this stigma everywhere
that sales is a pressure cooker ray there you have to hit quota and you it’s
either feast or famine so I said is it possible to find a place that it’s not
like that and so for me I narrowed it down to two places one of those was a
SAS company and they were very flexible with you and it was more about
developing you as a person and they were really patient with you and then the
other which I ultimately ended up at was very very very flexible in that sense so
it’s hard to describe it succinctly in one sentence to you but I think you have
to make that choice if if you know that you can’t handle pressure of crunching
numbers and and going up at the board at the end of the day and saying who sold
what then get a feel for that organization they’re going to be honest
with you about what their expectations are of you and you need to be honest
with them to about whether you’re going to be a right fit and for me I had to be
honest with some of the companies that I interviewed with and say i don’t think i
would thrive here think i would get burnt out and so I
ultimately landed at a place that is not a pressure cooker and very much helps
you along the way and doesn’t hold it over your head i mean i’m still held
accountable of course I mean you’re gonna be held accountable anywhere you
go and if not you should be concerned about that organization right so don’t
be afraid of accountability just just be honest with the people that you’re
working with and with yourself about where you feel you’re at whether you
think you should have pushed yourself a little harder or whether you feel like
overwhelmed just be honest about it yeah so I’ll approach this from a different
angle and it kind of transitioning right accountability you’re going to be
accountable no matter what your job or you know wherever you go after school
there’s going to be a level of accountability that’s going to be tied
to that sales is no exception certainly if for the group I guess that was there
a little bit earlier for Stuart’s leadership forum he gave you some
insight into one of the guiding pillars at Qualtrics which is transparency and
that really does permeate every aspect of the organization and I’ve got a
bookmark on my desktop that at any given moment I can pull up the performance
metrics for any given individual at the organization right I can see exactly as
granular as I want to how many calls they’ve made how many people they’ve
talked to how many of those conversations they’ve converted I can
see what their quota is I can see what they’ve already sold i can see what
they’ve got left to sell right there there’s very clear transparency when it
comes to not only your own performance but those around you and for me at least
personally i thrive under competition specifically i’m a very very competitive
person by nature i do not like to feel inferior to anyone right so when I have
that kind of insight into what’s happening around me and the skill set
around me it personally drives me I don’t feel that there’s anything held
over my head I don’t feel that my team leads or region leads are consistently
nagging me to get where I need to be so far as quaid quota attainment
for me it’s more of a driving force to say hey this is what’s expected but the
perspective the paradigm change is I want to blow through what’s expected I
want to become a standout I want to become an outlier I want to see this as
a target that I can move through and push through and therein I’m going to
see my own progression in my own career so it’s all about perspective if you
look at it like you know you’ve got these quotas hanging over your head yeah
that can be stressful and if you focus on that day in and day out your life is
going to be fairly miserable but if you can take that and look at that more as
an opportunity to blow through what’s expected and therein find your success
in your ability to be noticed and to progress a I think you’ll be more
successful so definitely out of balance but I feel
like there’s times when you need to have that out of balance so it can’t always
be a really like sometimes you’ve got finals right or whatever the case is and
that’s a little bit out of balance because you gotta push through that hard
part but then you can then you can once the finals are done you can kind of
regroup make things happen make that next game plan and make that big jump
for that next target that you’re going after so yes mine my life has been
totally out of balance for a little bit too long because of opening up Wasatch
north and it feels like a new product to us up here in in utah and but I I just
see kind of the finish line and actually it’s not even a finish line but it’s
like it’s just that next step and I’m pushing for it and I can see it and I
can feel the momentum building so I that’s what keeps me going every single
day and I have a great wife that is so helpful I mean that she’s like just like
a maybe a great business partner almost right because we kind of have our own
things but it’s really about managing that situation so that we know exactly
what our role is and we’ve set that expectation up front so that hey I
handle this part and you handle this part but you’re the manager over this
section so if you need help from someone else to be able to get this job done
whatever it may be even like as simple as dishes or whatever the case is let me
know because that’s not something that’s going to be one hundred percent on my
radar are all the time because I have other things around my plate but I’m
totally happy to help out and make make your your load easier but you just gotta
let me know so it’s all about communication
shin and and setting that up front and so yeah out of balance sometimes and I
think that’s a good thing I think that’s a good thing to have because if it’s I I
watched my dad at a ATK and he was really it was for quite a while it was
really kind of a just a almost like a nine-to-five type thing but it was
really like there wasn’t much there wasn’t much that it was there was really
pushing him for that next step and really what happened ATK if anybody
knows I get just pretty much went out of business right so there wasn’t those big
out of sync out of balance times and I think that’s a good thing to be in if
you’re out of balance I feel like that’s a good spot you know you’re pushing and
you know you’re you know you’re growing in some category so I actually like
being in that uncomfortable spa say one thing really quick so in sales you you
know you get kind of like into your day-to-day your you know dealing with
customers maybe one thing of advice that I would say is just outside of work you
know strive to do the things that you you love to do whether it’s with your
family or you know hobbies just try and keep those things there’s well I think
that that helps life you know be fulfilling I love art so Comic Con fans
isn’t you guys know comic-con is so my manager found out that I do our and I
was starting to get it out there and and I wasn’t gonna really tell anyone but I
actually came out here to Salt Lake Comic Con in September and sold my art
and she thought that was so cool and she told I all the VP so now I’m like doing
these like our projects at work for hey so it’s a it’s been pretty fun but yeah
definitely work life management is is something to always keep at the top of
mind just striving to be better at time management and keeping everything in
perspective so just so that I understand is the
question if you did well at door to door would you translate into the business to
business sales well okay I I don’t know that I would say that they’re so
different they are so completely different right going door-to-door in a
community and chatting with homeowners is not the same as speaking to c-level
executives you know about organizational wide problems so they are very different
but I I’m so grateful for the opportunity i had to do door-to-door it
was if i if i did it again there’s a lot of things i would do different but
that’s not one of them because it really really opened up my eyes to the
opportunities that existed in sales and it afforded me opportunities that I know
that my peers here at school did not have simultaneously and I entered that
specifically for one reason and one reason alone and it was because I’m not
as bright as a lot of you and I wasn’t on scholarship and I needed to pay for
school and it was the only way that I was going to go out and make the money
that I needed to that quickly and you know it was a very rewarding experience
I I wouldn’t trade it i’m glad that I’m not doing it currently there’s a reason
I transitioned out of that into business to business but it was an awesome
opportunity for me but success in that field does not necessarily transition as
well over to be to be just because they’re pretty stark contrast yeah good question so just to give you
an idea at least for software-as-a-service SAS tech companies
what a typical sales career looks like the kind of the entry-level position is
business development you’re either cold calling into accounts for the account
executives or you’re fielding inbound leads that are wanting to meet with
account executives to see the product and to go through that sales process so
you’ll typically start in that position and then the next position is to become
an actual sales rep or an account executive and then there’s different
levels of you know the size of companies that you’re working with different
territories and so there’s different opportunities within that account
executive position and then management after that so my career path i started
in that business development went into the account executive this was all at
Qualtrics and then left Qualtrics for a new opportunity at instructure with the
new product and started on their smaller mid-market account executive team and
and then transitioned into an enterprise role working with bigger companies and
so that’s kind of the path that I’ve gone down the next step in my career is
I want to be an individual contributor meaning i want to remain a sales rep for
the next little while just because there’s a lot of things that i want to
accomplish and then after that i want to become a sales manager and i eventually
i want to run an entire cell sales organization so that’s kind of my career
path and typical career path in sales does that answer your question actually
talked about this up there so it’s about letting your employer know what you want
to do right and as and as hard of a conversation that maybe there’s a book
Crucial Conversations right it really good so you just need to be good at
selling your yourself and your pitcher your big picture with the company and
they’re going to be more than happy to help you get to that spot just like
Stewart was saying he’s like if you don’t know then they can’t help you but
if they know what you want everyone is going to be more
than willing to help you out and get to that next spot so crucial conversations
is a really good one the next one would be you know just a what is the book it’s
a Harvard it’s a little Harvard book it’s I like short reads I I’m like a
magazine like clip type guys so I got to pick the small books that are really
easy so but it’s a creating business plans right create your own business
plan your own strategy within the company and then ask your manager or ask
your boss say hey how do I make the most amount of money at your company right
they’re going to be they’re going to love you that’s a question that they
would love every single employee to ask them how do I be the best employee and
how do I grow in your company it just being really transparent and really
really clear with what you want and they’re going to get you there along the
same lines is with transparency and letting people know what you want to do
11 time manager that I had we were talking about my career plan and what I
wanted to accomplish and he said you know to be honest with you I probably
don’t think about your career plan as often as you think I’m thinking about it
so just realize that that your managers or you know people you report to their
probably not thinking about you as often as you think and so it’s important and
affinity of you our sports fans I love basketball if you know the phrase
telegraphing your pass meaning the defender knows where you’re going to
pass you need to Telegraph your passes in in your professional career meaning
you need to let your managers know what you want to accomplish when you want to
accomplish them by and then ask them for their help of what it what it takes to
get there really quickly I had a really recent experience with this I’m clearly
not as developed as these guys happen I just barely graduated but um I I
basically felt that I needed to grow into a different position I agreed to a
position and I started to realize after a couple months like okay definitely
don’t want to stay here like I want to do some other things and I was very
timid at first about how to approach that because I felt like I didn’t have
the right to say that being there only a couple months
but for you specifically like I basically went to my senior VP of Sales
and then eventually to the CEO like I just had a meeting last night and I i
had a not another opportunity come my way that was significantly more money
and I didn’t really want to take it because i was happy where I was but you
know it makes me think right and so I basically went to them and said look
this is really uncomfortable but I I wasn’t looking for another offer you
know I’m very happy where I am but I got an offer and here’s what I want and they
were more than accommodating I mean it ended up working out really well for me
and it was just again like having those conversations and being really honest
about where you want to go and I think for me specifically i just had to
overcome being timid about it and saying like look this is no this is my life so
like i need i need to speak up about where i want to go right so just speak
up and be respectful about it my question we will chat that was what
this was what the position was offered it was at the marketing agency of my
dreams it came totally from left field I was not expecting it and I had to have
that conversation and I felt like sterling said like how did you make that
choice i thought i had already made the choice and then I had to make it again
right and so for me I I had a really honest discussion with my company and my
company is small and so it’s a lot different like it’s a it’s a very
tight-knit group it’s not nearly as big as these guys right like these are huge
organization so I had a little bit of flexibility but I basically went to them
and said here’s what I like about marketing here’s what I like about sales
here’s how I believe I can marry than to and make you money and and I’m going to
be happy as well and for me that worked and so I don’t so no I don’t feel like I
need to go I turned down the agency offer which not gonna lie it was a
little scary I was like am I sure am I sure but at the end of the day like I’m
happy where I’m at and what more can you ask for I basic I literally got to write
my own job description after having this discussion I don’t know what else you
could ask for so no I’m happy so if you can find somebody that’s willing to let
you marry the two if that’s what you’re interested in then absolutely go for it
and be vocal about it I yeah so I would recommend first and
foremost and it looks like you guys are already because you’re here right that’s
an indication that you’re on the right track leverage the opportunities number
one that the university is giving you two to gain exposure to the
opportunities that exist right so far as jobs are concerned number to leverage
the relationships that are available to you and for me personally I I just kind
of went to school I did my thing I you know I went for my degree so that I
could transition into the workforce and that’s what I was there for and you know
I didn’t put in a lot of effort beyond that until my last semester in school
when I realized you know it’s time to figure this out it’s time to make that
next step and I connected with Professor bone and he was integral in my own
experience in my own transition and you have a lot of opportunities the fact
again I’ve seen a lot of evolution even in the last year from when I was at the
University and now to have some exposure to a lot of really tremendous companies
that I don’t know I don’t know how to express what what exists here in utah
it’s rare what we have here in Utah the opportunities that are here in the
companies that thrive here it’s definitely unique and the relationships
that you have at your disposal that can help you get to the next step professor
Bowen lined up opportunities for me to interview frequently which was integral
in my ultimate interview with Qualtrics where I landed and he lined up lunches
for me where I had the opportunity to interface with potential hirers and you
know all of those things contribute you did ultimately to where I am now and
I didn’t leverage that until my last semester I was a pathetic throughout my
university experience and if I were to give you any recommendation it would be
to leverage the resources that are at your disposal currently build
relationships use those use the Alumni that exist there’s a lot of recent
alumni and these companies that you can reach out to personally I’d be happy to
help any one of you Tom helped me when I got to that point I knew Tom had been at
Qualtrics I i had heard through the grapevine i sent him a linkedin message
and asked him what his experience had been I asked him why he left right and
he gave me some honest feedback and that contributed to again to where I am
currently so leverage the professor’s leverage the Alumni leverage your peers
and leverage the opportunities that the university has afforded you in order to
make that transition alright I’ve got a one-liner for you you’re going to want
to write this down I can’t take credit for it my mentor one of my mentors told
this to me and I don’t know where he got it from but when you start your career
and and I would say this throughout your entire career don’t chase money but
chase success because when you chase success money always follows so that
would be my main advice all of you is when you’re looking for a job you’re
going to get some different offers some will be at this point some will be at
this point look for an opportunity where you can learn and you can grow and you
can develop into whatever you want to be in your career because once you stop
learning once you stop developing once it’s just a little stagnant and you’re
just in a rut doing the same stuff every day you’re not progressing in your
career and you’re probably not going to be making money when you are wanting to
be successful and you’re moving up and advancing and you you’re doing things in
your career that you want to accomplish then money will always follow and you’ll
be able to hit the financial goals that you have I remember when I graduated my
wife she’s a nurse she makes decent money and my first year out of college
she made more money than me I was like madness this is the worst but I I took I
took a job that I knew i was going to learn and I was going to develop and it
led to more opportunities and now these opportunities are developing into
different types of opportunities and I fit the financial goals that I’ve had
in mind when i graduated college so main devices don’t chase money but chase
success my wife’s a nurse to now man no that’s a it’s a good question be
involved network join clubs I mean like like they’ve said leverage the resources
i look back and you know i was in you know the marketing club the
entrepreneurship club you know i tried to push myself join those sales
competitions and and yeah just i would I think back I probably would have tried
to network more and try to get in with more with more businesses and try to
grow more relationships with those types of people and then also just try and
hone your skills hone your hone your passion you know what you want to do
what you’re passionate about go chase those things so I graduated and I lived
in Atlanta Georgia for in 2014 and it’s crazy to see where you know where a
career can take you so my wife and I just packed up and drove to Atlanta and
we live there and experience so many different things and we live downtown
and and it was just interesting to see you know where life takes you when you
when you take kind of a leap of faith I guess you could say that and so I could
just a couple things to think about is just strive to network more just be
involved because opportunities absolutely will present themselves when
you do those things if you’re just kind of stagnant or don’t want to put
yourself out there I don’t think the opportunities present themselves as much
so there’s my two cents on that I agree with everything these guys are saying so
i won’t nail the one thing I do want to nail again is network I mean you’re off
to a great start by being involved with sterling but I can’t speak to his can
actions enough I mean he introduced me to anybody and everybody I needed or
wanted to meet with so that was really helpful in in looking for a career and
then I think second to that is get outside of your comfort zone and don’t
be afraid for me the biggest difference came when I was willing to drive all the
way down to salt lake and like just see some of these companies that to me it
was like well there’s nothing than Logan so I kind of have to but to these
companies that I want to visit they were like wow you drove all the way down here
you know and so don’t be afraid to like go go out there and and get some face
time because that helps set you apart to begin with when you’re looking to get
hired and then I think especially networking to the extent that I met a
lot of great people just when I was hunting for a job and I mean we’re all
in sales and Utah’s a small community and so there were people that I left a
great relationship with though I didn’t take the job or whatever it may be that
now that I’m in sales it’s like oh we’re pursuing this client and do we know
anybody there and it’s like oh well I’m actually on good terms with the head
recruiter and let me see what they’re doing or whatever you know I mean that’s
the name of the game right just knowing more people more connections and always
make sure to leave on good terms even if you interview for a place that you
weren’t interested in and after the interview interview process you’re still
like no way like I’m not interested in this be polite be professional go out of
your way to leave a lasting impression on that person because it’ll pay off
down the road yeah all those answers are really really good so I have three
simple things one is do what you do what you say you’re going to do so get good
at that that’s big it goes a really long ways with every single person that you
interact with the next one would be to earn your job every day so make sure
that when you wake up in the morning you’re going to earn that job like it
was your first day or like it was your last day it’s going to you’re going to
make it happen every single day and the third thing is
is get good at taking a complicated thing and making it easy that’s where
the money’s at in any field you look at taking anything complicated a very
complicated question there’s a lot of answers even with that question take the
complicated situation make it really simple that’s what’s sellable and that’s
where the money is out traver trajectory to talk to your excellence program in
sales let me just put a shameless climb the
pro sells program some of you are going to see there’s a lot of bastards we now
learn process and these are students that you can approach to find out more
about opportunities to get involved with pro so we’re growing this program here
in Schools program husband sells Academy we seek out one of the students that is
wearing the mark myself and they’ll see Sean Lissemore email correspondence of
you can be in touch with future opportunities as they come to interact
with great plumbers other than that I wanted us remind those
are part of the coal sales program we have a special lunch and networking
question on the ninth floor because it’s building that a change of venue for
another conflict over the ninth for election but on behalf of the faculty
and personally thank you and from the students and our
administration let’s take all of our


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