Lumicom – WEEE compliant recycling scheme for the lighting industry

Lumicom – WEEE compliant recycling scheme for the lighting industry


The UK lighting sector has witnessed a
technological revolution. LED replacement programs across the UK have successfully reduced energy consumption by over fifty percent. But this is only part of the story. To complete the cycle, the lighting supply chain has a legal obligation to ensure that all lighting is treated and disposed of correctly, by approved recycling facilities. In the UK, approximately 10,000 tonnes of commercial luminaires are replaced each year. However, of this figure, only 30% is recorded as being treated through authorised compliant recycling channels. This highlights that potentially the remaining WEEE waste is being treated illegally or even entering landfill. Lumicom has created a bespoke system of using ton bags and a crane on the back of our vehicles which collects the luminaires and drops them into the back. Every time Lumicom makes a collection, we make sure that our partners fulfil their duty of care by giving them a waste transfer note at the point of collection which gives full traceability, because you have an obligation under the WEEE directive to hold those notes to be able to prove that your waste has been recycled. Lumicom specifically serve
the lighting industry. We work very closely with contractors, lighting manufacturers and recycling partners to provide a fully traceable recycling service. Lumicom’s model is excellent. They engage. They are completely different from most producer compliant schemes, and they actually have engaged with partners in the recycling chain. Rather than treating them as distant relationships, they actually want to get involved and develop those relationships at first hand, and we’ve been working with them for about two and a half years now. They want to make sure that their members, their materials that they collect, have
had the highest duty of care and ensure complete transparency down the recycling chain as well. Within the process all hazardous components are removed from the electrical waste; like PCBs, capacitors, batteries to avoid cross-contamination, these are all manually removed. For example, elements like Sodium contained within the lamp itself need to be carefully extracted. We not only recover the metal and put it back into a metal recovery route here in the UK, we also recover the glass outer in its pure form which goes off for aggregate use. Given the resources and materials that can be found in electrical waste, its management is vitally important so everything that can be isolated and
mechanically treated is placed back into the supply chain and reused. We call these clean stream materials. Another example of this is Copper. Itself a finite element and much sought-after in the world, it’s very important that as much as recovered as possible. Dedicated processes are in place to do this. Effectively, what’s being done is like an urban mine. Digging valuable materials out of the urban environment and putting them into the supply chain, back here in the UK or mainland Europe. We are living in an era of resource depletion. In the midst of this, we can help you create clean stream materials that can be reused. They go back into the supply chain for the manufacturing of new products. We can help you achieve, and maintain the standards of being responsible and the conservation of our environment.


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