Overview of BIM 360 Design

Overview of BIM 360 Design


The place to start is the Document Management module which provides data management for the entire project team. BIM authoring teams have told us that the cloud is a great way to collaborate, but working on their data needs to be seamless. So we set out to remove as much friction as possible. Folder level access control within the Document Management allows teams to define who can access individual pieces of information. Data coming in from Revit cloud worksharing inherits that permission as well as data coming in via Desktop Connector. So we have an integrated workflow that works in this permission system. We built a specific administrative workflow for the Design Collaboration module because teams work as teams… Multi-discipline teams… All a BIM manager needs to do is add users to an individual team here, and they all automatically get permissions across all folders necessary for them to exchange data . As you can see we can set up different permission levels to that data and that data is coming in from Revit. One of the components of the BIM 360 Design offering is Revit cloud worksharing. The process for setting up data for the cloud is really similar to Collaboration for Revit and it hasn’t been changed after updating a cloud model. We can use the publish settings tool to select views and sheets of the model to publish them to the cloud. So we group our design outputs into sets and we publish the model to the cloud to BIM 360 Document Management module. That brings us to the Design Collaboration module this module helps you collaborate efficiently with multiple firms. Your individual team works in its own space with complete control of how other product teams see the state of your work. Your team home is your team’s home portal. It provides an up-to-date view of the current state of the project model, as well as you can access all sets which were defined in the Revit environment. We have a great technology for viewing that no one in the market has. This aggregated view displays all models your team owns as well as all models consumed into your team environment. Here, you can isolate individual levels. You can toggle visibility of different disciplines, you can toggle individual teams. Let’s say I want to turn on the structural discipline (model) and I want to look at the architectural design and the MEP systems. As you can see, we can very quickly and easily display specific types of data in the viewer and get access to information we are looking for. I could even work in the full-screen exploring my data, while being in the web browser. Like I was saying, we have also access to all sets we defined in the Revit environment. Here I have seven sets defined. They are a combination of 2D and 3D views in sheets. I will be using them a bit later in my demo. Another great tool in the Design Collaboration module is the visual (project) timeline. This is a visual way of exchange of data or packages that collaborating teams have shared and consumed throughout the lifecycle of the project. Also using this timeline, you could switch over between teams of course if you are a member of more than one team. When you have a clear understanding on the current state of your project and you are ready to exchange your designs with the rest of the project teams, it is a perfect timing to create a package. A package is a container that allows you to bundle your team’s Revit models and sets to share with other teams. That’s why we define these sets to better control what we share with other teams. By controlling the sharing, in this way you can ensure that your work is prepared and ready for other teams. Teams can preview the package and decide when to consume it into their design environments. This reduces their disruption of constant change and allows all teams to freeze their deliverables at a certain version. And now, with one click, I can share this package with other teams. What I’m doing right now is I’m copying the individual versions of that data into my shared folder where other users of my project , i.e. other teams, have access. Let me jump into my other project where recently, some changes were made by the architectural team in their designs. In these changes, new designs were shared with the structural team via package in this project. I am a member of the structural team. I have already consumed the previous package that was shared with me by the architectural team, and I see on the timeline, there is a new one . Customers told us when they get new information, the first thing they want to know is how has it changed historically. They needed to review revision clouds so we integrated change visualization in this overall experience. It is automated and users don’t have to do anything. You can compare the changes between a given package and the previous package from the same team. You get a visual color coding about how that information has changed. The edit, removed, and modified buttons act as toggle to hide or show the results from the list. The summary provides a quick understanding of the amount of changes contained within the new revision. The number of changes within the list may vary when filters and search criteria are applied. Once all changes have been reviewed, then the individual team may decide to consume this package since these changes affect daily designs. Consuming a package means that you have brought another team’s package into your environment, not to own it or take responsibility for it, but to see it combined together with your work and with all other teams work on the timeline. You can see that the package is now filled to indicate that I have just consumed it. If Revit user is linked into the other team’s consumed online models, those Revit links are automatically updated in the team’s authoring environment.


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