Tilt Brush Tutorials: Lighting

Tilt Brush Tutorials: Lighting


IZZY PARKINSON: Hey, it’s you. Welcome back to round two of
our Tilt Brush tutorial series. Last time, we got things
started by learning more about environments as
well as their various effects on your paintings. But in this episode,
we’ll be diving even deeper into a wide
variety of options available to artists. Specifically, the lighting tool. Joining us once again to
help demonstrate exactly how this intuitive little device
works is the legendary George Peaslee. Understanding the light tool
is essential for any artist looking to take their
work to the next level, because it allows you to
manipulate both the scene’s primary and secondary colors
as well as the positions within it. Once you’ve finished
up your work of art– hey, nice one, George– you can whip out the lighting
tool from your canvas to get started. The lighting tool is accessible
only in the advanced mode and is represented as a
little sun-shaped icon. Once you’re comfortable with
your new custom palette, it’s time to
illuminate this baby. All of your lighting
tool options are represented by a
miniature model of our Earth. The sun, our brightest
light out of the bunch, is responsible for casting
major shadows across the scene, while the moon on
the other hand, provides a dimmer
illumination with no shadows. Our third option, referred
to as the fill light, creates an an even distribution
of both color and light throughout the scene, making it
the perfect tool for recoloring shadows of your scene. The lighting effect
is capable of turning a boring, run of the mill sketch
into a captivating composition. And for the most
dramatic results, think of using an
environment with a ground or object such as a pedestal. To manipulate these
spheres of light, simply grab each object
via the 3D representation of your canvas as if you were
playing with the sun and moon yourself. Easy, right? Just remember all of the changes
will have a direct effect on how your brushes will
appear in the scene, unless, of course,
you’re working on the illustrative workspace. And that’s lighting, folks. Remember, the difference
between an amateur sketch and a professional
masterpiece often comes down to the simplest
changes in lighting.


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