Using Stretch Planes & Stretch Zones to Edit Objects

Using Stretch Planes & Stretch Zones to Edit Objects


In this video, we’ll discuss stretch planes and
stretch zones in Chief Architect, including using stretch planes to
transform objects, using stretch planes for smart resizing and using stretch zones. The examples I’m going to show you are
pretty extreme as far as how far you would resize an object, but just keep in mind I’m doing that so
you can really see what’s going on with the stretch zones and stretch planes. But even if you’re resizing
an object a small amount, stretch planes and stretch zones are
very powerful and useful to help you restrict the areas that will be stretched
and squished when you resize your object. All right, let’s say I wanted to change
this nightstand into a wardrobe. I’ll just delete these accessories
off the top and stretch it out. But as you can see with no
stretch planes being used, the entire symbol just stretches
uniformly and that’s not what I want. So let’s try this again. I’ll hit the undo button and then right
click and choose open symbol and go to the sizing tab. And here is where I can add
stretch plains and stretch zones. A stretch plane tells Chief to allow
your object to stretch only where the stretch plane intersects with it. It is restricting what area of your
object is allowed to stretch with the new features that allow us to see the stretch
planes and stretch zones and manually move them. It’s not as important to
know how these numbers are working, but it’s still helpful to
know. So we will go over them. Stretch planes in the x axis intersect
left to right and effect your width. The y axis deals with the
depth of your object and z, the height. When you put
values in these boxes, Chief places stretch planes and these
values correspond to amounts you are moving away from the origin of the object. When I click on the show origin
button, you can see that in Chief, the origin is in the back
middle bottom of the object. X shoots off to the right. So a positive value in the x will
move your stretch plane to the right. While a negative value would move
it from the middle to the left. Notice the y axis is
shooting off away from us. So to bring a stretch
plane into our object, we will need to enter a negative value and Z is moving up. So a positive value will move a stretch
plane through the height of your object. Now these numbers might make more sense
as you can see that the values you enter in are the amount that they move
from the origin of the object. But thankfully with the new tools, we can now see the stretch planes
and manually move them with real time feedback. Let’s make this
nightstand into a wardrobe. Now I’ll resize it and get the results
I was after instead of the whole thing stretching uniformly like this. Okay, let’s say I wanted to make
one of these chairs into a bench. I’ll clean up the scene and then in
my plan view over to the left here, I’ll just pull the chair
out increasing its width. But now it looks cartoony
with these stretched out legs. I’ll hit control z to undo and let’s
right click on it and select open symbol. Okay, I want it to stretch only in the middle
so the legs don’t stretch when I resize it. All right, great. And I think it should be shallower
in the seat area as a bench. So I’ll decrease the depth
and let’s pull it across. But now I don’t like how
the legs got squished thin, so I’ll hit control Z to undo a couple
times and let’s select open symbol again. Let’s place a stretch plane
in the y axis for the depth, and move it to the middle of the seat so
that the legs do not get squished into thin legs when I decrease
the depth of my object. And now when I resize my chair, it only stretches and shrinks where
the stretch planes are intersecting, so the legs are not
effected. Beautiful. Okay, so we’ve covered stretch planes,
but what about stretch zones? Let’s say I don’t like this cow patterned
ottoman and I want one that matches my long bench. I’ll use the copy and paste in place tool
and drag out my new copy of the bench, rotate it, and shrink it
down to the right size. But now if you look, the legs are thin and it looks like that
ottoman will break if I put my feet up on it. So let’s open this symbol up and
add some stretch planes. Okay so I could just, uh, add two stretch planes here and here. But when I shrink down the width
of all those nice tufted details, they are not going to have anywhere to go. And so they will fold over on each
other and make a mess like this. So let’s use a stretch zone. We’ll go over and click the box under
“uniform stretch zones between” and this creates a stretch zone
between my two stretch planes. Now instead of restricting the stretching
of my object to only the places that my stretch planes
intersect with the object, the entire space inside of my stretch
zone will stretch when I resize my object. Stretch zones are great for encompassing
parts of objects that have a lot of detail that you want to stretch
together. Now when I decrease the width, the legs are not effected because
they are outside my stretch zone. We use stretch zones when we are importing
cathedral or arched cabinet doors. But you can see in this example that a
simple stretch plane works great in the z axis for when the height
gets changed on this door. The rails of the door on the top
and bottom will stay the same. And with the stretch zone, the styles on the left and right will
also remain the same size when the doors width is changed. But it will allow the arched area
in the middle to squash and stretch. So now we’ve seen how we can use stretch
planes and stretch zones to smartly resize objects in Chief Architect.
And that concludes our tutorial.


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